10 images, 5 wall texts (150 words each), one introduction wall text (250 words)

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10 images, 5 wall texts (150 words each), one introduction wall text (250 words).
Learning Goals: After completion of this assignment, students will be able to
devise an exhibition topic and develop a theme
express an exhibition statement concisely, justify its relevance, and support the topic with artworks or objects
write short and long labels
organize works of art in a meaningful way that tells a story
This assignment asks that you think creatively about issues we have discussed in the course so far. It draws on your previous assignments, but you can begin working on the project at any time. You should begin this project at least two weeks before it is due. Dedicate a bit of time to it every day.
In this assignment, you will create an imaginary exhibition by using the collections of major museums of Western Art. Begin with the work of art you used in your first two assignments. Develop a theme for exhibition connected to this work of art. You might want to consider a theme based on subject matter, contextual issues, historical time and place, or a critique of Western art institutions, histories, or practices.
Once you have developed a theme, begin to look for works of art to include in your exhibition. Ensure these works of art are in the public domain. A list of approved open access image sites follows this description. Look at many works of art that fit within your theme. Choose the 10 best works of art. When choosing, consider your criteria. Why have you chosen these works of art? How do they work with one another? How might you arrange them to tell reviewers a story about your theme?
Once you have selected 10 works of art for your exhibition, begin to conduct research on them. Conduct research on your exhibition theme, as well as on individual works of art. Focus on five works of art. One of the five should be the same work of art you used in your visual analysis and historical analysis.[1] Use strong sources. If you are unsure, look to guidelines from your two previous assignments. You should also consult the library research guide for this course.
Begin to prepare the material for your exhibition. Save everything you write in a Word document so that you can easily cut and paste it into your PowerPoint presentation. This will serve as a backup. Create a file for all your images. Download and save the 10 images you have chosen. Make sure that the file names indicate what they are so that you can easily find them again.
Begin writing the basic labels. All 10 works of art must be labeled with the same information you would put in a caption. Ensure you have formatted these properly. See module 6 for information about how to write labels. You can do your labels in one of two ways, but you must be consistent:
Use Chicago Style footnotes as described in the library research guide: Firstname Lastname, Title, date, medium, height × width × depth (unit conversion), physical location, accessed from book/website (date accessed, if website).
Use the style described in the V & A guidelines from Module 8.
Next, compose detailed labels for five of your works of art. Choose what you see as the five most important works of art in your exhibition. Each detailed label should include the following, in this order:
the label you already wrote
a 150-word narrative about the work of art that situates it within your theme. This could include historical information, context about relationships to other works of art in the exhibition and beyond, information about the artist, eight development of your theme, et cetera. You must cite all sources used in your research. Use Chicago Style.
a bibliography of all works consulted to write your detailed label. Use Chicago Style.
Finally, write a 250-word introduction to your exhibition. This introduction should introduce your theme, providing whatever background information you feel is necessary to understand your point, and explain why the theme or topic is important (i.e. Why have an exhibition on this theme? What does it show us that is important?)
Consider the flow of your exhibition and how do you want viewers to experience it.
Now it is time to assemble your exhibition. You can use MS PowerPoint* to assemble your exhibition if you are comfortable with that. If not, use an MS Word Document
Your exhibition should include the following:
Title page with the title of your exhibition, your name, the course number, and the date
An introductory text describing your theme and introducing viewers to your exhibition
10 works of art arranged in the order you want the viewer to see them. Each work of art should go on a separate page/slide. Each work of art should include a basic label. Five should be accompanied by detailed labels.
A final page/slide with a bibliography
* If you are using PowerPoint, choose the “Save your document as a .pdf” option. Choose either “slides” view or “notes” view depending on how you have inserted the text into your presentation. If the size of your .pdf file is very large, go back to your PowerPoint and reduced the size of your images. See https://brocku.ca/information-technology/service-catalogue/office-365/powerpoint/#1573154237377-6613b9e0-5ab4 and follow the instructions. Save your PowerPoint again and make a new .pdf.

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