American Revolution

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Assignment Instructions
Using evidence from the the four historical documents provided on the following pages, answer the question, “Did non-Protestants and religious dissenters benefit from the American Revolution?”
Your essay should discuss the various ways in which the American Revolution affected the lives of individuals who did not belong to the dominant Protestant Christian church of the state in which they lived. For example, what types of political freedoms did Jewish individuals have following the American Revolution? What about Catholics?
Your essay must contain a thesis statement. For example, “This paper will argue that non-Protestants and religious dissenters did (or did not) benefit from the American Revolution because…”
Paper Details:
2-3 pages in length
one-inch margins
Double-spaced.
DO NOT put an extra space between paragraphs
Times New Roman, 12 pt. font
Proof read your paper for errors
Use past tense
Any evidence of plagiarism or cheating of any kind will result in a “0” for the assignment
Submission Details:
When you submit your paper to Canvas within the Week 16 Module please identify your degree program (AA, AS or AAT) in the upper-right corner of the first page of your submitted work. Do not include your name, my name, or the class section. In other words, when I print out your papers I do not want to see anything but your degree in the right hand corner of the paper.
Document 1: Petition of the Philadelphia Synagogue
Introduction
In addition to questions concerning freedom of worship, new American governments also had to deal with the issue of political rights for dissenting Protestants and non-Protestants. Pennsylvania’s 1776 constitution imposed no religious test on voting; every adult male taxpayer was entitled to vote. It did, however, require office-holders to acknowledge the divine inspiration of the Christian Bible. In 1783, a number of Jews living in Philadelphia objected to the provision and submitted the petition below to state officials.
Document
[Petition of the Philadelphia Synagogue to Council of Censors of Pennsylvania, December 23, 1783:]
The Memorial of Rabbi Ger. Seixas of the Synagogue of the Jews at Philadelphia, Simon Nathan their Parnass or President, Asher Myers, Bernard Gratz and Haym Salomon the Mahamad, or Associates of their council in behalf of themselves and their brethren Jews, residing in Pennsylvania,
Most respectfully showeth,
That by the tenth section of the Frame of Government of this Commonwealth, it is ordered that each member of the general assembly of representatives of the freemen of Pennsylvania, before he takes his seat, shall make and subscribe a declaration, which ends in these words, “I do acknowledge the Scriptures of the old and new Testament to be given by divine inspiration,” to which is added an assurance, that “no further or other religious test shall ever hereafter be required of any civil officer or magistrate in this state.”
Your memorialists beg leave to observe, that this clause seems to limit the civil rights of your citizens to one very special article of the creed; whereas by the second paragraph of the declaration of the rights of the inhabitants, it is asserted without any other limitation than the professing the existence of God, in plain words, “that no man who acknowledges the being of a God can be justly deprived or abridged of any civil rights as a citizen on account of his religious sentiments.” But certainly this religious test deprives the Jews of the most eminent rights of freemen, solemnly ascertained to all men who are not professed Atheists.
May it please your Honors,
Although the Jews in Pennsylvania are but few in number, yet liberty of the people in one country, and the declaration of the government thereof, that these liberties are the rights of the people, may prove a powerful attractive to men, who live under restraints in another country. Holland and England have made valuable acquisitions of men, who for their religious sentiments, were distressed in their own countries. — And if Jews in Europe or elsewhere, should incline to transport themselves to America, and would, for reason of some certain advantage of the soil, climate, or the trade of Pennsylvania, rather become inhabitants thereof, than of any other State; yet the disability of Jews to take seat among the representatives of the people, as worded by the said religious test, might determine their free choice to go to New York, or to any other of the United States of America, where there is no such like restraint laid upon the nation and religion of the Jews, as in Pennsylvania. — Your memorialists cannot say that the Jews are particularly fond of being representatives of the people in assembly or civil officers and magistrates in the State; but with great submission they apprehend that a clause in the constitution, which disables them to be elected by their fellow citizens to represent them in assembly, is a stigma upon their nation and religion, and it is inconsonant with the second paragraph of the said bill of rights; otherwise Jews are as fond of liberty as their religious societies can be, and it must create in them a displeasure, when they perceive that for their professed dissent to doctrine, which is inconsistent with their religious sentiments, they should be excluded from the most important and honourable part of the rights of a free citizen.
Your memorialists beg further leave to represent, that in the religious books of the Jews, which are or may be in every man’s hands, there are no such doctrines or principles established as are inconsistent with the safety and happiness of the people of Pennsylvania, and that the conduct and behaviour of the Jews in this and the neighbouring States, has always tallied with the great design of the Revolution; that the Jews of Charlestown, New York, New-Port and other posts, occupied by the British troops, have distinguishedly suffered for their attachment to the Revolution principles; and their brethren at St. Eustatius, for the same cause, experienced the most severe resentments of the British commanders. The Jews of Pennsylvania in proportion to the number of their members, can count with any religious society whatsoever, the Whigs among either of them; they have served some of them in the Continental army; some went out in the militia to fight the common enemy; all of them ha

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