As you move into Chapter 1 of the Slave Ship, it is important to take the right

As you move into Chapter 1 of the Slave Ship, it is important to take the right

As you move into Chapter 1 of the Slave Ship, it is important to take the right kind of notes for you to truly understand how Rediker is exploring the 4 Dramas that he discussed in his Introduction.
For this part of the note taking process, you will have three parts for each narrative.
A- create a short summary of each narrative,
B- Include where the information came from by looking at the Slave Ship NOTES. Follow the footnotes at the end of each paragraph and then look to the PDF NOTES to figure out what sources the information came from.
C- List and define any words you don’t know.
You must do this FOR ALL THE NARRATIVES! This is going to take you a long time. Do not wait until the last minute and try to do it all at once. You should space out your time and work on one or two a day.
Submit your Summary Practice on a Word or PDF, double spaced, 12 point Times New Roman, 1 ” margins.
HERE IS AN EXAMPLE OF HOW IT SHOULD BE DONE:
Example:
A- Summary of each of the 14 narratives in Chpt 1. I used Captain Toomba as my example. Write a few sentences on who he is and why his story is important to us. You should have at least three to four sentences for each Narrative. There are 14 in total, including the Greedy Robbers.
B- The Notes. Use the NOTES PDF to figure out where the sources are in each narrative. For example, at the end of the Toomba narrative there is a tiny little #3. That is the endnote. Go to the NOTES PDF and find the notes for the INTRODUCTION on the specified page. The heading of each page tells you which pages the notes are for, Chapter 1 starts on 365 and says Notes to Pages 11-22 in the heading. Look for the #3 there, it starts with Testimony of Henry Ellison- Then copy down the information from that note and put it as part B. For the really big ones, you can just pick the ones that look the most interesting, but you should have at least three of each narrative. That way I know that you know how to look up citations to find information.
C-Definitions. List any words you don’t know or are unfamiliar with. You need at least one for each narrative.
DO NOT USE OUTSIDE SOURCES ONLY THE BOOK!

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