I will provide you with the link to the only resource you need. https://www.comm

I will provide you with the link to the only resource you need.
https://www.commisceo-global.com/resources/country-guides/china-guide#c4
Use 3-8 bullet points to write each part
1. Religions & Beliefs
2. Naming Conventions
3. Meeting and Greeting Protocol/Gifts (only the gifts part)
4. Personal Space
5. Food/ Dining
(I have an example provided by the professor in the attachment.)

 

 

Museums have the potential to teach us about how we understand both ourselves an

Museums have the potential to teach us about how we understand both ourselves and the culture to which we belong. How we narrate the story of our society through the objects we produce and hold up as meaningful teaches us deeper lessons in what we value and how we relate to each other in the world.
Because we live in a racialized society, the objects our society has produced are also racialized, and as such, can clue us into how race is currently ordering our social relations. As Stuart Hall taught us, culture functions as the mechanism through which we create shared racial meanings in our society, for better or for worse.
In this course, we’ve discussed several examples of museums, exhibits, and displays that have something to teach us about race. On the one hand, we’ve explored how museums and exhibits have been used to forward racist projects, like in the case of the anthropological “human zoos” popular at the turn of the century and in our reading about the experience of Saartjie Baartman’s display as a “missing link.” On the other hand, we’ve also explored how museums and exhibits have been used as racial projects to illuminate the racist histories of various historical orders of race. For example, Dr, David Pilgrim’s Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia: Using Objects of Intolerance for Teaching Tolerance draws on objects produced during the Jim Crow era to criticize Jim Crow racism, not endorse it.
Now that we are nearing the end of the quarter, this final project will ask you to be the curator of your own gallery show. Reflecting on the racial order in which we currently live in today, imagine that you are the curator of a small museum or gallery attempting to select objects that tell the story of race in contemporary America. This wording is intentionally broad so that you can be as creative or expansive with interpreting the prompt as you wish.
REQUIRED COMPONENTS
Specifically, your project will need to include the following components:
Choose a theme for your show. What is the name of your exhibition? Why did you choose it? Write 1 paragraph explaining the overarching point your show is trying to make and what viewpoint or provocations you hope the audience will leave with after seeing it
Choose 3 cultural objects that illustrate something interesting or significant about race and/or racism in America today. Use your imagination! Objects can really be anything–memes, photographs, newspaper articles, everyday ephemera, tweets, TikToks, fashion trends, movies, etc. Include a photo/screenshot/link of each object you decide to choose. You can also choose more than three objects if you want to discuss several examples, but make sure that there are three distinct sub-themes you end up writing about and at least three objects to accompany those sub-themes.
Write a short paragraph for each object, describing (1) why you chose the object to illustrate your show’s theme and (2) what it can tell us about how race and racism are being socially constructed, practiced, or institutionalized. Make sure to draw on at least one concept or theory from the course per object to deepen your descriiption of each object and to tie its significance back into the course content.
You can have the final project be as fancy or simple as you want. “Simple” would entail just having a document with subheadings for “THEME,” “OBJECT 1 – PHOTO AND DESCRIPTION,” “OBJECT 2 – PHOTO AND DESCRIPTION,” and “OBJECT 3 – PHOTO AND DESCRIPTION” with all the associated text for each section. “Fancy” would entail having those sections and doing something more visually creative with them (e.g. collage what your show might look like, add a background, add other visual details, etc.). You won’t get docked any points for going simple with the final project, but we’ll add up to an extra point of additional credit for more creative projects as a bonus. So if you get a perfect score and also have an interesting creative element, you’d get a 20 + 1 = 21 total.

 

 

Heterosexism Complete the following assignment Choose a topic below and discuss

Heterosexism
Complete the following assignment
Choose a topic below and discuss the role of sexuality in that culture.
Ancient Greece and Sexuality (1500 BCE – 200 CE)
Native Americans and the third sex (1400-1860 CE)
Ancient Romans and Homophobia (300 BCE – 500 CE)
Christianity and Homophobia (300 CE – 1600 CE)
Islam and Homophobia (662 CE – 1600 CE)
Homophobia in the United States (1960-2000)
Homosexuality in India (1940-2009)
The AIDS crisis in the US (1983-1993)
The Castro District of San Francisco (1940-1985)
Matthew Shepherd Laramie, Wyoming (1998)
Yoruba Culture and Homosexuality (1500-2000)
Any topic of your choosing with professor approval
Instructions
Answer ALL of the following questions in a numbered format. 2-3 pages. APA citations only. 12 font. Times New Roman. Number each question before answering it. All work must be properly cited, do not include pure opinions with no evidence.
Outline the basic history of the event(s). You can use a timeline or write it out.
How did your society or era perceive sexuality in general and homosexuality in particular?
What role did religion play in perceived norms of sexuality and homosexuality?
What values, beliefs, and attitudes are reflected in the roles of sexuality and homosexuality in your culture?
What were the benefits, punishments, or detriments to not adhering to the norms in your chosen society?
How did your topic’s views on sexuality influence modern American perceptions about sexuality and homosexuality?
Rubric

 

 

Complete the required discussion prompt: Heteronormative is the idea that binary

Complete the required discussion prompt:
Heteronormative is the idea that binary gender identity and heterosexual orientation (meaning, there are only two sexual orientations and genders) are the norm. Gender identity is where you see yourself on the continuum of gender (if you identify with the sex you were born with at birth, you are considered cisgender). Meanwhile, sexual orientation is who you are attracted to, and can range from being straight/heterosexual to being gay or anything on the spectrum between.
Certainly, there are a lot of labels. For many people, they’re a way of identifying themselves and discovering their identities; others, on the other hand, choose to avoid labels altogether. But no matter which camp you fall into, there are many reasons why heteronormativity is an idea that should be rejected.
If you’re not heteronormative, you’re forced to explain yourself, while cisgender and heterosexual people don’t have to.
When your identity does not cohere with heteronormativity, you are often asked to explain yourself — why you don’t have a boyfriend/girlfriend, how sex for you “works,” and other insensitive, inappropriate questions.
Assuming that people only identify as either male or female is incorrect
In our world, we commonly think of gender as just male and female, especially when we’re categorized by things like color and clothing. It seems like we can’t even look at anything without seeing it divided into boys and girls — this is heteronormativity. But the thing is, not everyone identifies as one or the other or expresses themselves that way. Even if someone “looks” like a guy (also evidence of heteronormativity), they may prefer to use the pronouns “she/her” — and we need to respect that by not misgendering people. Some people identify as genderfluid, which means that your identity (like male or female), can move from one side of the spectrum to the other, and some people are genderless or identify with neither of the genders that are imposed on people. The most important thing to remember is that everyone’s gender can be unique and everyone’s gender identity, gender orientation, and gender expression are important to respect.
Further, “female” and “male” even as solely biological designations still exclude some people, who are often classified as “intersex.” Intersex means that one’s anatomy or genetics does not line up with typical expectations for either male or female people. Heteronormativity would have society believe that to be intersex is to not be normal — which is simply untrue. For intersex people, doctors and parents have often decided their gender at birth and genital reconstructive surgery is performed to turn what is seen as atypical genitalia into something that is recognizably either male or female. Intersex identity also has its own spectrum, which means that the anatomy of an intersex person can be entirely different from another intersex person.
Assuming all people are straight is incorrect.
Plain and simple, not everyone is straight. And not everyone is gay or straight. Less than 50% of the teen population currently identifies as straight, but even if the majority of people identified as straight, it’s wrong to assume someone falls into the majority. This is the erasure of all other identities that do not fall under heteronormativity. To make sure everyone feels respected and represented, never assume anything about someone’s identity unless they tell you themselves.
Heteronormativity leads to serious consequences for those who aren’t heteronormative.
The National Coalition for the Homeless reports that while 10% of the youth population in the U.S. are LGBTQ (and this is only the reported figure), 20% of homeless youth in the U.S. are LGBTQ. And the Trevor Project puts that figure at 40%.
And it’s not just in homeless shelters and on the street where LGBTQ youth face harassment and safety issues. Even if families are supportive of LGBTQ identities, the statistics on school bullying against LGBTQ people are alarming. The Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network (GLSEN) in the year 2010 study showed that while appearance was the top reason for bullying, “the second most common reason was actual or assumed sexual orientation and gender identity.” Its figures indicated that 82% of LGBTQ youth had been bullied over their actual or assumed sexual orientation in the past year alone. Sixty-four percent of respondents felt unsafe at school because of their sexual orientation, while 44% felt unsafe at school because of their gender identity.
Unfortunately, statistics on violence against LGBTQ people, especially those who are transgender, are equally as troubling. In the U.S. alone, transgender homicides hit an all-time high in consecutive years from 2015 to 2019 — none of which were prosecuted as hate crimes.
Answer the prompts below (be sure to answer all parts of questions)
What is the difference between heterosexism and homophobia?
Can homosexuals change their sexual orientation if they want to or are people born with their orientation? And if so, can heterosexuals do the same?
Why do researchers generally recommend using the term “sexual orientation” rather than “sexual preference”?
Should discrimination based on sexual orientation be outlawed to the same extent as discrimination based on race and sex?
If people believe in a literal interpretation of the Bible, is it still prejudiced for them to do the following:
regard homosexual behavior as sinful?
view homosexuality as an abomination before God?
support the death penalty for homosexual behavior?
Why or why not?
Why do people call homosexuality unnatural, when it exists in all sexual species in nature?
attached is the ted talk vidoe link

 

 

1. The first part of the paper should summarize the main points of the Looting P

1. The first part of the paper should summarize the main points of the Looting PDF in your own summarized words do not copy the text unless providing examples.
2. In the second half of the paper, use the reading to craft a response to the documentary. For example, your reaction can include (but is not limited to) an analysis of the parallels/incongruencies between the reading and the documentary.
Whose Streets? – An unflinching look at the Furgeson uprising is a documentary that marks a breaking point for the residents of St. Louis, Missouri. Empowered parents, artists, and teachers from around the country come together as freedom fighters. WHOSE STREETS? is a powerful battle cry from a generation fighting, not for their civil rights, but for the right to live.
You will have to access Kanopy to watch this documentary. Kanopy is a video resource that is free for all Cal State LA students. If you need help logging into Kanaopy click HERE.
I will provide login information! Message me
Once you have successfully logged in, click HERE to access the documentary.
https://calstatela.kanopy.com/product/whose-streets

 

 

Questions: Environmental crime can take various different forms and sizes. Pleas

Questions:
Environmental crime can take various different forms and sizes. Please provide an actual example (or case) of an environmental crime that you believe is one of the most harmful to life and our planet.
Classmate Summary Patrick response: Decide if you agree or disagree with his response. Explain why or why not.
Patrick repsonse:
An environmental crime is defined as an illegal act that has harmful ramifications on biodiversity, wildlife, and natural resources such as timber (United Nations, n.d.). These crimes are not necessarily victimless as some might believe because damage to the environment can cause health problems and other ramifications. As any white-collar crime, these crimes are not causing immediate problems, but rather have long-term negative effects on individuals, wildlife, and the world as a whole.
I believe one of the most harmful forms of environmental crime we are actively seeing today is illegal logging in the Amazon Rainforest. Between August of 2019 and July of 2020, 1.5 million acres of the Amazon Rainforest were cut down (Ennes, 2021). A large portion of these activities is predicted to be illegal. There are short and long-term ramifications for such actions. The Amazon is a carbon sink meaning it is a source of taking in a large portion of the world’s carbon dioxide and changing it to oxygen. Removing such a large carbon sink will cause emissions to rise up substantially due to fewer trees being available to take in carbon dioxide. Additionally, the encroaching logging disrupts thousands of animal habitats (many endangered) causing damage to the species.
The criminal nature of the logging also promotes other crimes within the area such as poaching and illegal drug trade as criminals take advantage of the land as a staging ground for an activity that further harms the environment. Pollution of the jungle is another concern as the soil becomes destroyed and the ensuing waste created causing greater issues all around.
The long-term problems associated with the loss of the Amazon are immense as it is a source of oxygen production for the entire world and lowers greenhouse gases within the atmosphere. A loss of this magnitude would likely contribute to global heating and the problems associated with more emissions in the atmosphere. It is a domino effect that starts from the ground and leads to a worldwide issue down the road. One that needs to mitigate soon to prevent further damage across the board.

 

 

Why is this a crime or social harm? (3 PAGES IN LENGTH) Why is this act classifi

Why is this a crime or social harm? (3 PAGES IN LENGTH)
Why is this act classified as a crime, or why would this act be considered a social harm? Some things are not written into law and punishable as a crime, per se, but due to the social harms, could constitute a crime. What criminal, civil, regulatory, or international laws were violated? Were other non-legal, moral, or social standards used to classify this act as a crime? Would there be widespread agreement that this is a criminal act or social harm? Explain why or why not in detail

 

 

Why is this a crime or social harm? (3 PAGES IN LENGTH) Why is this act classifi

Why is this a crime or social harm? (3 PAGES IN LENGTH)
Why is this act classified as a crime, or why would this act be considered a social harm? Some things are not written into law and punishable as a crime, per se, but due to the social harms, could constitute a crime. What criminal, civil, regulatory, or international laws were violated? Were other non-legal, moral, or social standards used to classify this act as a crime? Would there be widespread agreement that this is a criminal act or social harm? Explain why or why not in detail

 

 

1. We have talked about autonomy already but let’s look a little deeper into oth

1. We have talked about autonomy already but let’s look a little deeper into other ethical principles. One that comes to mind is fidelity. We have posted a definition of fidelity under Course materials for this week. We would like you to try and apply it to conservatorships and guardianships. What role does fidelity play in conservatorships and guardianships?
2. Do you think conservatorships/guardianships are ethical? Explain.
3. Do you think conservatorships/guardianships are moral? Explain.
Britney Spears Conservatorship: Ethical Dilemmas

#FreeBritney: Autonomy, Conservatorships, and Mental Health in America


https://bioethics.miami.edu/education/ethics-curricula/geriatrics-and-ethics/decision-making-autonomy-valid-consent-and-guardianship/index.html

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fidelity
https://theconversation.com/the-disturbing-history-of-how-conservatorships-were-used-to-exploit-swindle-native-americans-165140

 

 

1. We have talked about autonomy already but let’s look a little deeper into oth

1. We have talked about autonomy already but let’s look a little deeper into other ethical principles. One that comes to mind is fidelity. We have posted a definition of fidelity under Course materials for this week. We would like you to try and apply it to conservatorships and guardianships. What role does fidelity play in conservatorships and guardianships?
2. Do you think conservatorships/guardianships are ethical? Explain.
3. Do you think conservatorships/guardianships are moral? Explain.
Britney Spears Conservatorship: Ethical Dilemmas

#FreeBritney: Autonomy, Conservatorships, and Mental Health in America


https://bioethics.miami.edu/education/ethics-curricula/geriatrics-and-ethics/decision-making-autonomy-valid-consent-and-guardianship/index.html

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fidelity
https://theconversation.com/the-disturbing-history-of-how-conservatorships-were-used-to-exploit-swindle-native-americans-165140