Reading instruction : As noted above, what we know of Aristotle (i.e. chapter

Reading instruction :
As noted above, what we know of Aristotle (i.e. chapter 9- pp. 182 to 220) is from his notes. In chapter 9, the stuff on formal logic is not as important as the stuff about causality, and then moral psychology. The reason for this is that his view of causality may sound familiar, even if false. Of course, it is still propounded by various religions, typically disregarding modern science. However, as we know since Darwin, natural events have no real teleology but only undergo slow changes. In Aristotlean terms, this is what he called efficient causality. About moral psychology, his views coincide with philosophers such as Alistair Macintyre and Martha Nussbaum, as well as many social psychologists. So his view of moral psychology (e.g. the stuff that constitutes virtue and happiness) should also sound quite familiar. But actually, Aristotle not only propounds a theory of how we are morally motivated to act, and of the virtues we develop, but he also identifies these things with morality itself.
Just as with Socrates and Plato, Shields gives a great summary of Aristotle in Ancient Philosophy.
Aristotle is famous for his virtue ethics, which is still popular today. To see why this is, we can turn to Aristotle himself. Although he might be dull to read- what we call his books are actually his lecture notes- he is still easy to read. So here is his Nicomachean Ethics, albeit in an older translation. In all its essentials, his virtue ethics is contained in chapters ( 1 and 2. So here that is.)
Topic instruction:
In this second week, you have done a lot of reading. Aristotle can be difficult to read, even in summary. In this short essay, answer just one of the following questions:
1. When it comes to causation, Aristotle mentions 4 kinds of causation. Scientists today, actually, would only mention efficient causes. What are these formal and final causes, respectively? Give your own examples. Do these kinds of causation exist at all?
2. Aristotle insists that happiness is only produced by developing certain virtues. What is a virtue, exactly? Why does he think specific virtues are necessary to be happy? Do you agree, or not?
3. Aristotle’s view of the soul is really not the Christian one. What is his view of the soul? What survives death? What would this survival be like? Explain.
As always, remember to answer the question you choose specifically, and so, do not give general answers. What are the arguments?

 

 

This research paper will be the culmination of the research you proposed in week

This research paper will be the culmination of the research you proposed in week 4. Be sure you have followed the instructions below; Writing a philosophy paper and Directions for how to format your paper as an argument.
Upload it as an MS Word document. If you attach it as a PDF or any other format that is not APUS compatible it will not be graded.
Your paper should be 1500 – 2000 words (excluding the cover page and citation page)
Your paper should have at least 5 academic resources
You may use MLA or APA formatting
Use the APUS Online Library and the Philosophy Research Guide https://www.apus.edu/apus-library/online-research/research/research-guides/school-of-arts-humanities/philosophy

 

 

Purpose The reflection paper provides you with an opportunity to explore the dif

Purpose
The reflection paper provides you with an opportunity to explore the difficulties inherent in defining sex as a general category. You will develop your own understanding of sex and its benefits and limitations.
Directions
For this assignment, you should reflect on the difficulties in precisely defining sex. Please relate to the expert interview for this module.
Your reflection is to be 1-2 pages long (250-300 words), typed, and double-spaced. Remember that the maximum length requirement is an important aspect of this assignment. Please cite sources following APA style.
Submission
Submit your reflection as an attachment (.doc or .docx) by clicking the Submit Assignment button above.
Grading
The assignment will be graded on a 100 point scale. It is worth 5% of your course grade.
Please review the rubric below to understand how the assignment will be graded.
Page 4 of 6 in Module 1
Proceed to the next page by clicking the Next button at the bottom of the screen.
Rubric
BLHS 046 Reflection Assignment Grading Rubric
BLHS 046 Reflection Assignment Grading Rubric
Criteria Ratings Pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Content Reflection
50 pts
Exceeds Expectations
Reflection demonstrates a high degree of critical thinking in applying, analyzing, and evaluating key course concepts and theories from readings, lectures, media, discussions activities, and/or assignments. Insightful and relevant connections made through contextual explanations, inferences, and examples.
40 pts
Meets Expectations
Reflection demonstrates some degree of critical thinking in applying, analyzing, and/or evaluating key course concepts and theories from readings, lectures, media, discussions activities, and/or assignments. Connections made through explanations, inferences, and/or examples.
30 pts
Does Not Meet Expectations
Reflection lacks critical thinking. Superficial connections are made with key course concepts and course materials, activities, and/or assignments
50 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Personal Growth
30 pts
Exceeds Expectations
Conveys strong evidence of reflection on own work with a personal response to the self-assessment questions posed. Demonstrates significant personal growth and awareness of deeper meaning through inferences made, examples, well developed insights, and substantial depth in perceptions and challenges. Synthesizes current experience into future implications.
24 pts
Meets Expectations
Conveys evidence of reflection on own work with a personal response to the self-assessment questions posed. Demonstrates satisfactory personal growth and awareness through some inferences made, examples, insights, and challenges. Some thought of the future implications of current experience.
18 pts
Does Not Meet Expectations
Conveys inadequate evidence of reflection on own work in response to the self-assessment questions posed. Personal growth and awareness are not evident and/or demonstrates a neutral experience with negligible personal impact. Lacks enough inferences, examples, personal insights and challenges, and/or future implications are overlooked.
30 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Writing Quality
20 pts
Exceeds Expectations
Well written and clearly organized using standard English, characterized by elements of a strong writing style and basically free from grammar, punctuation, usage, and spelling errors.
16 pts
Meets Expectations
Above average writing style and logically organized using standard English with minor errors in grammar, punctuation, usage, and spelling.
12 pts
Does Not Meet Expectations
Poor writing style lacking in standard English, clarity, language used, and/or frequent errors in grammar, punctuation, usage, and spelling. Needs work.
20 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Timeliness
0 pts
0 points deducted
Journal reflection is submitted on or before deadline.
0 pts
1-5 points deducted
Journal reflection is submitted within 1 day (24 hours) after the deadline.
0 pts
6-10 points deducted
Journal reflection is submitted 2-3 days (49-72 hours) after the deadline.
0 pts
Total Points: 100
Course Description
The American poet and short story writer Raymond Carver once wrote: “It ought to make us feel ashamed when we talk like we know what we’re talking about when we talk about love.” Indeed, a little reflection shows that love is perplexing, and the same can be said of the related concepts of gender and sexuality.
Strong bonds exist between parents and children, romantic lovers, friends, and fellow citizens. How can love come in so many forms? Can we reason our way out of conflicts between them? Is there a duty to love strangers?
Sexuality is a battleground where love can seemingly become perverse or unethical. Do celibates sacrifice something important? Can one love multiple romantic partners simultaneously? Is it wrong to? Should marriage be restricted to opposite-sex couples, or to couples rather than groups? Is pornography oppressive or obscene? Should sex work be legalized and normalized?
Does gender determine what forms of love and sex are natural? Should transgender folks be guaranteed access to restrooms and other public facilities of their choice? And what is sex, anyway? Does masturbation count? Is virginity important?
The goal of the course is to help us become more thoughtful about the problems and possibilities of gender, love, and sexuality. Our investigation will lead us through a comparative study of the many contrasting visions of love and sex we find expressed in great works of art and literature and within ethical perspectives both secular and religious throughout Western history. Some authors whose work we will examine include Thomas Aquinas, Judith Butler, Irving Singer, Martha Nussbaum, and Audre Lorde.
Course Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:
Interpret rationally our own actions and experiences by examining our assumptions and commitments about what living well requires of us.
Evaluate and critique philosophical arguments and develop your own.
Explain key concepts and theories within the philosophical study of gender, love, and sexuality.
Develop a critical and thoughtful relationship with your own beliefs and assumptions about issues of right and wrong surrounding gender, love, and sexuality.
Communicate ideas effectively and listen more carefully to those of others.
Develop and improve public speaking skills.
Collaborate effectively with others in developing a plan for thoughtfully responding to challenging empirical, conceptual, and ethical issues around gender, love, and sexuality.
Exercise and improve the skills of rigorous analysis and respectful dialogue in order to become better citizens of a free society where you do not always agree but nevertheless exchange reasons for your beliefs and actions in a civil and public-spirited way.
Required Course Materials
Required Textbooks
There are two required textbooks for this course.
Frankfurt, H. G. (2006). The reasons of love. Princeton University Press.
Halwani, R., Soble, A., Hoffman, S., & Held, J. (Eds). (2017). The philosophy of sex: Contemporary readings (7th ed.). Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Overview of Assignments
This is an online course, and this course is highly interactive. All course readings, videos, notes, and other materials are posted online. You are required to read course material, and participate/post class discussions on a timely regular basis, according to posted instructions. Regular completion of reading assignments and participation in online discussions are essential to the course. In order to successfully complete this course, you must demonstrate your understanding of the material by:
Reading the required weekly text chapters and/or assigned articles
Watching the video lectures
Participating actively in the online asynchronous discussions and collaborating with your assigned group
Completing the two reflection assignments
Submitting a short paper
Writing a midterm paper and final paper
Here is an overview of all of the assignments in the course.
Online Discussions: Students will be divided into small groups and write and post in the discussion forums regularly throughout the term. Each discusses the main topic of the module, synthesizes the readings (300 words), and includes two replies to other students’ posts (100 words). One of the group members is required to record a 3-5 minute video to summarize the group discussion and share it with the entire class. The discussion activities provide students with an opportunity to deeply reflect on the readings assigned to each module and relate them to real-world situations. All of the posts on the discussion board are required to be thoughtful, reflective, and concise.
At the end of the semester, you will score your entire team, including yourself, based on the quality of each member’s contributions. Your instructor will average these scores and make any necessary adjustments to determine your Peer Evaluation grade.
Reflection Assignments: There are two reflection assignments in the course. The first reflection requires you to reflect on the difficulties in precisely defining sex. Your reflection should be 1-2 pages long (250-300 words), typed, and double-spaced. The second reflection requires you to tour an art exhibit or collection, either virtually or at a gallery or museum in your area. You should select an artwork whose representation of sexual orientation or erotic partnership in human life you find thought-provoking or compelling. You will prepare a 3-5 minute video presentation and share it with the class in a discussion forum.

 

 

Purpose The reflection paper provides you with an opportunity to explore the dif

Purpose
The reflection paper provides you with an opportunity to explore the difficulties inherent in defining sex as a general category. You will develop your own understanding of sex and its benefits and limitations.
Directions
For this assignment, you should reflect on the difficulties in precisely defining sex. Please relate to the expert interview for this module.
Your reflection is to be 1-2 pages long (250-300 words), typed, and double-spaced. Remember that the maximum length requirement is an important aspect of this assignment. Please cite sources following APA style.
Submission
Submit your reflection as an attachment (.doc or .docx) by clicking the Submit Assignment button above.
Grading
The assignment will be graded on a 100 point scale. It is worth 5% of your course grade.
Please review the rubric below to understand how the assignment will be graded.
Page 4 of 6 in Module 1
Proceed to the next page by clicking the Next button at the bottom of the screen.
Rubric
BLHS 046 Reflection Assignment Grading Rubric
BLHS 046 Reflection Assignment Grading Rubric
Criteria Ratings Pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Content Reflection
50 pts
Exceeds Expectations
Reflection demonstrates a high degree of critical thinking in applying, analyzing, and evaluating key course concepts and theories from readings, lectures, media, discussions activities, and/or assignments. Insightful and relevant connections made through contextual explanations, inferences, and examples.
40 pts
Meets Expectations
Reflection demonstrates some degree of critical thinking in applying, analyzing, and/or evaluating key course concepts and theories from readings, lectures, media, discussions activities, and/or assignments. Connections made through explanations, inferences, and/or examples.
30 pts
Does Not Meet Expectations
Reflection lacks critical thinking. Superficial connections are made with key course concepts and course materials, activities, and/or assignments
50 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Personal Growth
30 pts
Exceeds Expectations
Conveys strong evidence of reflection on own work with a personal response to the self-assessment questions posed. Demonstrates significant personal growth and awareness of deeper meaning through inferences made, examples, well developed insights, and substantial depth in perceptions and challenges. Synthesizes current experience into future implications.
24 pts
Meets Expectations
Conveys evidence of reflection on own work with a personal response to the self-assessment questions posed. Demonstrates satisfactory personal growth and awareness through some inferences made, examples, insights, and challenges. Some thought of the future implications of current experience.
18 pts
Does Not Meet Expectations
Conveys inadequate evidence of reflection on own work in response to the self-assessment questions posed. Personal growth and awareness are not evident and/or demonstrates a neutral experience with negligible personal impact. Lacks enough inferences, examples, personal insights and challenges, and/or future implications are overlooked.
30 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Writing Quality
20 pts
Exceeds Expectations
Well written and clearly organized using standard English, characterized by elements of a strong writing style and basically free from grammar, punctuation, usage, and spelling errors.
16 pts
Meets Expectations
Above average writing style and logically organized using standard English with minor errors in grammar, punctuation, usage, and spelling.
12 pts
Does Not Meet Expectations
Poor writing style lacking in standard English, clarity, language used, and/or frequent errors in grammar, punctuation, usage, and spelling. Needs work.
20 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Timeliness
0 pts
0 points deducted
Journal reflection is submitted on or before deadline.
0 pts
1-5 points deducted
Journal reflection is submitted within 1 day (24 hours) after the deadline.
0 pts
6-10 points deducted
Journal reflection is submitted 2-3 days (49-72 hours) after the deadline.
0 pts
Total Points: 100
Course Description
The American poet and short story writer Raymond Carver once wrote: “It ought to make us feel ashamed when we talk like we know what we’re talking about when we talk about love.” Indeed, a little reflection shows that love is perplexing, and the same can be said of the related concepts of gender and sexuality.
Strong bonds exist between parents and children, romantic lovers, friends, and fellow citizens. How can love come in so many forms? Can we reason our way out of conflicts between them? Is there a duty to love strangers?
Sexuality is a battleground where love can seemingly become perverse or unethical. Do celibates sacrifice something important? Can one love multiple romantic partners simultaneously? Is it wrong to? Should marriage be restricted to opposite-sex couples, or to couples rather than groups? Is pornography oppressive or obscene? Should sex work be legalized and normalized?
Does gender determine what forms of love and sex are natural? Should transgender folks be guaranteed access to restrooms and other public facilities of their choice? And what is sex, anyway? Does masturbation count? Is virginity important?
The goal of the course is to help us become more thoughtful about the problems and possibilities of gender, love, and sexuality. Our investigation will lead us through a comparative study of the many contrasting visions of love and sex we find expressed in great works of art and literature and within ethical perspectives both secular and religious throughout Western history. Some authors whose work we will examine include Thomas Aquinas, Judith Butler, Irving Singer, Martha Nussbaum, and Audre Lorde.
Course Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:
Interpret rationally our own actions and experiences by examining our assumptions and commitments about what living well requires of us.
Evaluate and critique philosophical arguments and develop your own.
Explain key concepts and theories within the philosophical study of gender, love, and sexuality.
Develop a critical and thoughtful relationship with your own beliefs and assumptions about issues of right and wrong surrounding gender, love, and sexuality.
Communicate ideas effectively and listen more carefully to those of others.
Develop and improve public speaking skills.
Collaborate effectively with others in developing a plan for thoughtfully responding to challenging empirical, conceptual, and ethical issues around gender, love, and sexuality.
Exercise and improve the skills of rigorous analysis and respectful dialogue in order to become better citizens of a free society where you do not always agree but nevertheless exchange reasons for your beliefs and actions in a civil and public-spirited way.
Required Course Materials
Required Textbooks
There are two required textbooks for this course.
Frankfurt, H. G. (2006). The reasons of love. Princeton University Press.
Halwani, R., Soble, A., Hoffman, S., & Held, J. (Eds). (2017). The philosophy of sex: Contemporary readings (7th ed.). Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Overview of Assignments
This is an online course, and this course is highly interactive. All course readings, videos, notes, and other materials are posted online. You are required to read course material, and participate/post class discussions on a timely regular basis, according to posted instructions. Regular completion of reading assignments and participation in online discussions are essential to the course. In order to successfully complete this course, you must demonstrate your understanding of the material by:
Reading the required weekly text chapters and/or assigned articles
Watching the video lectures
Participating actively in the online asynchronous discussions and collaborating with your assigned group
Completing the two reflection assignments
Submitting a short paper
Writing a midterm paper and final paper
Here is an overview of all of the assignments in the course.
Online Discussions: Students will be divided into small groups and write and post in the discussion forums regularly throughout the term. Each discusses the main topic of the module, synthesizes the readings (300 words), and includes two replies to other students’ posts (100 words). One of the group members is required to record a 3-5 minute video to summarize the group discussion and share it with the entire class. The discussion activities provide students with an opportunity to deeply reflect on the readings assigned to each module and relate them to real-world situations. All of the posts on the discussion board are required to be thoughtful, reflective, and concise.
At the end of the semester, you will score your entire team, including yourself, based on the quality of each member’s contributions. Your instructor will average these scores and make any necessary adjustments to determine your Peer Evaluation grade.
Reflection Assignments: There are two reflection assignments in the course. The first reflection requires you to reflect on the difficulties in precisely defining sex. Your reflection should be 1-2 pages long (250-300 words), typed, and double-spaced. The second reflection requires you to tour an art exhibit or collection, either virtually or at a gallery or museum in your area. You should select an artwork whose representation of sexual orientation or erotic partnership in human life you find thought-provoking or compelling. You will prepare a 3-5 minute video presentation and share it with the class in a discussion forum.

 

 

Purpose The reflection paper provides you with an opportunity to explore the dif

Purpose
The reflection paper provides you with an opportunity to explore the difficulties inherent in defining sex as a general category. You will develop your own understanding of sex and its benefits and limitations.
Directions
For this assignment, you should reflect on the difficulties in precisely defining sex. Please relate to the expert interview for this module.
Your reflection is to be 1-2 pages long (250-300 words), typed, and double-spaced. Remember that the maximum length requirement is an important aspect of this assignment. Please cite sources following APA style.
Submission
Submit your reflection as an attachment (.doc or .docx) by clicking the Submit Assignment button above.
Grading
The assignment will be graded on a 100 point scale. It is worth 5% of your course grade.
Please review the rubric below to understand how the assignment will be graded.
Page 4 of 6 in Module 1
Proceed to the next page by clicking the Next button at the bottom of the screen.
Rubric
BLHS 046 Reflection Assignment Grading Rubric
BLHS 046 Reflection Assignment Grading Rubric
Criteria Ratings Pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Content Reflection
50 pts
Exceeds Expectations
Reflection demonstrates a high degree of critical thinking in applying, analyzing, and evaluating key course concepts and theories from readings, lectures, media, discussions activities, and/or assignments. Insightful and relevant connections made through contextual explanations, inferences, and examples.
40 pts
Meets Expectations
Reflection demonstrates some degree of critical thinking in applying, analyzing, and/or evaluating key course concepts and theories from readings, lectures, media, discussions activities, and/or assignments. Connections made through explanations, inferences, and/or examples.
30 pts
Does Not Meet Expectations
Reflection lacks critical thinking. Superficial connections are made with key course concepts and course materials, activities, and/or assignments
50 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Personal Growth
30 pts
Exceeds Expectations
Conveys strong evidence of reflection on own work with a personal response to the self-assessment questions posed. Demonstrates significant personal growth and awareness of deeper meaning through inferences made, examples, well developed insights, and substantial depth in perceptions and challenges. Synthesizes current experience into future implications.
24 pts
Meets Expectations
Conveys evidence of reflection on own work with a personal response to the self-assessment questions posed. Demonstrates satisfactory personal growth and awareness through some inferences made, examples, insights, and challenges. Some thought of the future implications of current experience.
18 pts
Does Not Meet Expectations
Conveys inadequate evidence of reflection on own work in response to the self-assessment questions posed. Personal growth and awareness are not evident and/or demonstrates a neutral experience with negligible personal impact. Lacks enough inferences, examples, personal insights and challenges, and/or future implications are overlooked.
30 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Writing Quality
20 pts
Exceeds Expectations
Well written and clearly organized using standard English, characterized by elements of a strong writing style and basically free from grammar, punctuation, usage, and spelling errors.
16 pts
Meets Expectations
Above average writing style and logically organized using standard English with minor errors in grammar, punctuation, usage, and spelling.
12 pts
Does Not Meet Expectations
Poor writing style lacking in standard English, clarity, language used, and/or frequent errors in grammar, punctuation, usage, and spelling. Needs work.
20 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Timeliness
0 pts
0 points deducted
Journal reflection is submitted on or before deadline.
0 pts
1-5 points deducted
Journal reflection is submitted within 1 day (24 hours) after the deadline.
0 pts
6-10 points deducted
Journal reflection is submitted 2-3 days (49-72 hours) after the deadline.
0 pts
Total Points: 100
Course Description
The American poet and short story writer Raymond Carver once wrote: “It ought to make us feel ashamed when we talk like we know what we’re talking about when we talk about love.” Indeed, a little reflection shows that love is perplexing, and the same can be said of the related concepts of gender and sexuality.
Strong bonds exist between parents and children, romantic lovers, friends, and fellow citizens. How can love come in so many forms? Can we reason our way out of conflicts between them? Is there a duty to love strangers?
Sexuality is a battleground where love can seemingly become perverse or unethical. Do celibates sacrifice something important? Can one love multiple romantic partners simultaneously? Is it wrong to? Should marriage be restricted to opposite-sex couples, or to couples rather than groups? Is pornography oppressive or obscene? Should sex work be legalized and normalized?
Does gender determine what forms of love and sex are natural? Should transgender folks be guaranteed access to restrooms and other public facilities of their choice? And what is sex, anyway? Does masturbation count? Is virginity important?
The goal of the course is to help us become more thoughtful about the problems and possibilities of gender, love, and sexuality. Our investigation will lead us through a comparative study of the many contrasting visions of love and sex we find expressed in great works of art and literature and within ethical perspectives both secular and religious throughout Western history. Some authors whose work we will examine include Thomas Aquinas, Judith Butler, Irving Singer, Martha Nussbaum, and Audre Lorde.
Course Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:
Interpret rationally our own actions and experiences by examining our assumptions and commitments about what living well requires of us.
Evaluate and critique philosophical arguments and develop your own.
Explain key concepts and theories within the philosophical study of gender, love, and sexuality.
Develop a critical and thoughtful relationship with your own beliefs and assumptions about issues of right and wrong surrounding gender, love, and sexuality.
Communicate ideas effectively and listen more carefully to those of others.
Develop and improve public speaking skills.
Collaborate effectively with others in developing a plan for thoughtfully responding to challenging empirical, conceptual, and ethical issues around gender, love, and sexuality.
Exercise and improve the skills of rigorous analysis and respectful dialogue in order to become better citizens of a free society where you do not always agree but nevertheless exchange reasons for your beliefs and actions in a civil and public-spirited way.
Required Course Materials
Required Textbooks
There are two required textbooks for this course.
Frankfurt, H. G. (2006). The reasons of love. Princeton University Press.
Halwani, R., Soble, A., Hoffman, S., & Held, J. (Eds). (2017). The philosophy of sex: Contemporary readings (7th ed.). Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Overview of Assignments
This is an online course, and this course is highly interactive. All course readings, videos, notes, and other materials are posted online. You are required to read course material, and participate/post class discussions on a timely regular basis, according to posted instructions. Regular completion of reading assignments and participation in online discussions are essential to the course. In order to successfully complete this course, you must demonstrate your understanding of the material by:
Reading the required weekly text chapters and/or assigned articles
Watching the video lectures
Participating actively in the online asynchronous discussions and collaborating with your assigned group
Completing the two reflection assignments
Submitting a short paper
Writing a midterm paper and final paper
Here is an overview of all of the assignments in the course.
Online Discussions: Students will be divided into small groups and write and post in the discussion forums regularly throughout the term. Each discusses the main topic of the module, synthesizes the readings (300 words), and includes two replies to other students’ posts (100 words). One of the group members is required to record a 3-5 minute video to summarize the group discussion and share it with the entire class. The discussion activities provide students with an opportunity to deeply reflect on the readings assigned to each module and relate them to real-world situations. All of the posts on the discussion board are required to be thoughtful, reflective, and concise.
At the end of the semester, you will score your entire team, including yourself, based on the quality of each member’s contributions. Your instructor will average these scores and make any necessary adjustments to determine your Peer Evaluation grade.
Reflection Assignments: There are two reflection assignments in the course. The first reflection requires you to reflect on the difficulties in precisely defining sex. Your reflection should be 1-2 pages long (250-300 words), typed, and double-spaced. The second reflection requires you to tour an art exhibit or collection, either virtually or at a gallery or museum in your area. You should select an artwork whose representation of sexual orientation or erotic partnership in human life you find thought-provoking or compelling. You will prepare a 3-5 minute video presentation and share it with the class in a discussion forum.

 

 

Purpose The reflection paper provides you with an opportunity to explore the dif

Purpose
The reflection paper provides you with an opportunity to explore the difficulties inherent in defining sex as a general category. You will develop your own understanding of sex and its benefits and limitations.
Directions
For this assignment, you should reflect on the difficulties in precisely defining sex. Please relate to the expert interview for this module.
Your reflection is to be 1-2 pages long (250-300 words), typed, and double-spaced. Remember that the maximum length requirement is an important aspect of this assignment. Please cite sources following APA style.
Submission
Submit your reflection as an attachment (.doc or .docx) by clicking the Submit Assignment button above.
Grading
The assignment will be graded on a 100 point scale. It is worth 5% of your course grade.
Please review the rubric below to understand how the assignment will be graded.
Page 4 of 6 in Module 1
Proceed to the next page by clicking the Next button at the bottom of the screen.
Rubric
BLHS 046 Reflection Assignment Grading Rubric
BLHS 046 Reflection Assignment Grading Rubric
Criteria Ratings Pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Content Reflection
50 pts
Exceeds Expectations
Reflection demonstrates a high degree of critical thinking in applying, analyzing, and evaluating key course concepts and theories from readings, lectures, media, discussions activities, and/or assignments. Insightful and relevant connections made through contextual explanations, inferences, and examples.
40 pts
Meets Expectations
Reflection demonstrates some degree of critical thinking in applying, analyzing, and/or evaluating key course concepts and theories from readings, lectures, media, discussions activities, and/or assignments. Connections made through explanations, inferences, and/or examples.
30 pts
Does Not Meet Expectations
Reflection lacks critical thinking. Superficial connections are made with key course concepts and course materials, activities, and/or assignments
50 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Personal Growth
30 pts
Exceeds Expectations
Conveys strong evidence of reflection on own work with a personal response to the self-assessment questions posed. Demonstrates significant personal growth and awareness of deeper meaning through inferences made, examples, well developed insights, and substantial depth in perceptions and challenges. Synthesizes current experience into future implications.
24 pts
Meets Expectations
Conveys evidence of reflection on own work with a personal response to the self-assessment questions posed. Demonstrates satisfactory personal growth and awareness through some inferences made, examples, insights, and challenges. Some thought of the future implications of current experience.
18 pts
Does Not Meet Expectations
Conveys inadequate evidence of reflection on own work in response to the self-assessment questions posed. Personal growth and awareness are not evident and/or demonstrates a neutral experience with negligible personal impact. Lacks enough inferences, examples, personal insights and challenges, and/or future implications are overlooked.
30 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Writing Quality
20 pts
Exceeds Expectations
Well written and clearly organized using standard English, characterized by elements of a strong writing style and basically free from grammar, punctuation, usage, and spelling errors.
16 pts
Meets Expectations
Above average writing style and logically organized using standard English with minor errors in grammar, punctuation, usage, and spelling.
12 pts
Does Not Meet Expectations
Poor writing style lacking in standard English, clarity, language used, and/or frequent errors in grammar, punctuation, usage, and spelling. Needs work.
20 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Timeliness
0 pts
0 points deducted
Journal reflection is submitted on or before deadline.
0 pts
1-5 points deducted
Journal reflection is submitted within 1 day (24 hours) after the deadline.
0 pts
6-10 points deducted
Journal reflection is submitted 2-3 days (49-72 hours) after the deadline.
0 pts
Total Points: 100
Course Description
The American poet and short story writer Raymond Carver once wrote: “It ought to make us feel ashamed when we talk like we know what we’re talking about when we talk about love.” Indeed, a little reflection shows that love is perplexing, and the same can be said of the related concepts of gender and sexuality.
Strong bonds exist between parents and children, romantic lovers, friends, and fellow citizens. How can love come in so many forms? Can we reason our way out of conflicts between them? Is there a duty to love strangers?
Sexuality is a battleground where love can seemingly become perverse or unethical. Do celibates sacrifice something important? Can one love multiple romantic partners simultaneously? Is it wrong to? Should marriage be restricted to opposite-sex couples, or to couples rather than groups? Is pornography oppressive or obscene? Should sex work be legalized and normalized?
Does gender determine what forms of love and sex are natural? Should transgender folks be guaranteed access to restrooms and other public facilities of their choice? And what is sex, anyway? Does masturbation count? Is virginity important?
The goal of the course is to help us become more thoughtful about the problems and possibilities of gender, love, and sexuality. Our investigation will lead us through a comparative study of the many contrasting visions of love and sex we find expressed in great works of art and literature and within ethical perspectives both secular and religious throughout Western history. Some authors whose work we will examine include Thomas Aquinas, Judith Butler, Irving Singer, Martha Nussbaum, and Audre Lorde.
Course Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:
Interpret rationally our own actions and experiences by examining our assumptions and commitments about what living well requires of us.
Evaluate and critique philosophical arguments and develop your own.
Explain key concepts and theories within the philosophical study of gender, love, and sexuality.
Develop a critical and thoughtful relationship with your own beliefs and assumptions about issues of right and wrong surrounding gender, love, and sexuality.
Communicate ideas effectively and listen more carefully to those of others.
Develop and improve public speaking skills.
Collaborate effectively with others in developing a plan for thoughtfully responding to challenging empirical, conceptual, and ethical issues around gender, love, and sexuality.
Exercise and improve the skills of rigorous analysis and respectful dialogue in order to become better citizens of a free society where you do not always agree but nevertheless exchange reasons for your beliefs and actions in a civil and public-spirited way.
Required Course Materials
Required Textbooks
There are two required textbooks for this course.
Frankfurt, H. G. (2006). The reasons of love. Princeton University Press.
Halwani, R., Soble, A., Hoffman, S., & Held, J. (Eds). (2017). The philosophy of sex: Contemporary readings (7th ed.). Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Overview of Assignments
This is an online course, and this course is highly interactive. All course readings, videos, notes, and other materials are posted online. You are required to read course material, and participate/post class discussions on a timely regular basis, according to posted instructions. Regular completion of reading assignments and participation in online discussions are essential to the course. In order to successfully complete this course, you must demonstrate your understanding of the material by:
Reading the required weekly text chapters and/or assigned articles
Watching the video lectures
Participating actively in the online asynchronous discussions and collaborating with your assigned group
Completing the two reflection assignments
Submitting a short paper
Writing a midterm paper and final paper
Here is an overview of all of the assignments in the course.
Online Discussions: Students will be divided into small groups and write and post in the discussion forums regularly throughout the term. Each discusses the main topic of the module, synthesizes the readings (300 words), and includes two replies to other students’ posts (100 words). One of the group members is required to record a 3-5 minute video to summarize the group discussion and share it with the entire class. The discussion activities provide students with an opportunity to deeply reflect on the readings assigned to each module and relate them to real-world situations. All of the posts on the discussion board are required to be thoughtful, reflective, and concise.
At the end of the semester, you will score your entire team, including yourself, based on the quality of each member’s contributions. Your instructor will average these scores and make any necessary adjustments to determine your Peer Evaluation grade.
Reflection Assignments: There are two reflection assignments in the course. The first reflection requires you to reflect on the difficulties in precisely defining sex. Your reflection should be 1-2 pages long (250-300 words), typed, and double-spaced. The second reflection requires you to tour an art exhibit or collection, either virtually or at a gallery or museum in your area. You should select an artwork whose representation of sexual orientation or erotic partnership in human life you find thought-provoking or compelling. You will prepare a 3-5 minute video presentation and share it with the class in a discussion forum.

 

 

Purpose The reflection paper provides you with an opportunity to explore the dif

Purpose
The reflection paper provides you with an opportunity to explore the difficulties inherent in defining sex as a general category. You will develop your own understanding of sex and its benefits and limitations.
Directions
For this assignment, you should reflect on the difficulties in precisely defining sex. Please relate to the expert interview for this module.
Your reflection is to be 1-2 pages long (250-300 words), typed, and double-spaced. Remember that the maximum length requirement is an important aspect of this assignment. Please cite sources following APA style.
Submission
Submit your reflection as an attachment (.doc or .docx) by clicking the Submit Assignment button above.
Grading
The assignment will be graded on a 100 point scale. It is worth 5% of your course grade.
Please review the rubric below to understand how the assignment will be graded.
Page 4 of 6 in Module 1
Proceed to the next page by clicking the Next button at the bottom of the screen.
Rubric
BLHS 046 Reflection Assignment Grading Rubric
BLHS 046 Reflection Assignment Grading Rubric
Criteria Ratings Pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Content Reflection
50 pts
Exceeds Expectations
Reflection demonstrates a high degree of critical thinking in applying, analyzing, and evaluating key course concepts and theories from readings, lectures, media, discussions activities, and/or assignments. Insightful and relevant connections made through contextual explanations, inferences, and examples.
40 pts
Meets Expectations
Reflection demonstrates some degree of critical thinking in applying, analyzing, and/or evaluating key course concepts and theories from readings, lectures, media, discussions activities, and/or assignments. Connections made through explanations, inferences, and/or examples.
30 pts
Does Not Meet Expectations
Reflection lacks critical thinking. Superficial connections are made with key course concepts and course materials, activities, and/or assignments
50 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Personal Growth
30 pts
Exceeds Expectations
Conveys strong evidence of reflection on own work with a personal response to the self-assessment questions posed. Demonstrates significant personal growth and awareness of deeper meaning through inferences made, examples, well developed insights, and substantial depth in perceptions and challenges. Synthesizes current experience into future implications.
24 pts
Meets Expectations
Conveys evidence of reflection on own work with a personal response to the self-assessment questions posed. Demonstrates satisfactory personal growth and awareness through some inferences made, examples, insights, and challenges. Some thought of the future implications of current experience.
18 pts
Does Not Meet Expectations
Conveys inadequate evidence of reflection on own work in response to the self-assessment questions posed. Personal growth and awareness are not evident and/or demonstrates a neutral experience with negligible personal impact. Lacks enough inferences, examples, personal insights and challenges, and/or future implications are overlooked.
30 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Writing Quality
20 pts
Exceeds Expectations
Well written and clearly organized using standard English, characterized by elements of a strong writing style and basically free from grammar, punctuation, usage, and spelling errors.
16 pts
Meets Expectations
Above average writing style and logically organized using standard English with minor errors in grammar, punctuation, usage, and spelling.
12 pts
Does Not Meet Expectations
Poor writing style lacking in standard English, clarity, language used, and/or frequent errors in grammar, punctuation, usage, and spelling. Needs work.
20 pts
This criterion is linked to a Learning Outcome Timeliness
0 pts
0 points deducted
Journal reflection is submitted on or before deadline.
0 pts
1-5 points deducted
Journal reflection is submitted within 1 day (24 hours) after the deadline.
0 pts
6-10 points deducted
Journal reflection is submitted 2-3 days (49-72 hours) after the deadline.
0 pts
Total Points: 100
Course Description
The American poet and short story writer Raymond Carver once wrote: “It ought to make us feel ashamed when we talk like we know what we’re talking about when we talk about love.” Indeed, a little reflection shows that love is perplexing, and the same can be said of the related concepts of gender and sexuality.
Strong bonds exist between parents and children, romantic lovers, friends, and fellow citizens. How can love come in so many forms? Can we reason our way out of conflicts between them? Is there a duty to love strangers?
Sexuality is a battleground where love can seemingly become perverse or unethical. Do celibates sacrifice something important? Can one love multiple romantic partners simultaneously? Is it wrong to? Should marriage be restricted to opposite-sex couples, or to couples rather than groups? Is pornography oppressive or obscene? Should sex work be legalized and normalized?
Does gender determine what forms of love and sex are natural? Should transgender folks be guaranteed access to restrooms and other public facilities of their choice? And what is sex, anyway? Does masturbation count? Is virginity important?
The goal of the course is to help us become more thoughtful about the problems and possibilities of gender, love, and sexuality. Our investigation will lead us through a comparative study of the many contrasting visions of love and sex we find expressed in great works of art and literature and within ethical perspectives both secular and religious throughout Western history. Some authors whose work we will examine include Thomas Aquinas, Judith Butler, Irving Singer, Martha Nussbaum, and Audre Lorde.
Course Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:
Interpret rationally our own actions and experiences by examining our assumptions and commitments about what living well requires of us.
Evaluate and critique philosophical arguments and develop your own.
Explain key concepts and theories within the philosophical study of gender, love, and sexuality.
Develop a critical and thoughtful relationship with your own beliefs and assumptions about issues of right and wrong surrounding gender, love, and sexuality.
Communicate ideas effectively and listen more carefully to those of others.
Develop and improve public speaking skills.
Collaborate effectively with others in developing a plan for thoughtfully responding to challenging empirical, conceptual, and ethical issues around gender, love, and sexuality.
Exercise and improve the skills of rigorous analysis and respectful dialogue in order to become better citizens of a free society where you do not always agree but nevertheless exchange reasons for your beliefs and actions in a civil and public-spirited way.
Required Course Materials
Required Textbooks
There are two required textbooks for this course.
Frankfurt, H. G. (2006). The reasons of love. Princeton University Press.
Halwani, R., Soble, A., Hoffman, S., & Held, J. (Eds). (2017). The philosophy of sex: Contemporary readings (7th ed.). Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Overview of Assignments
This is an online course, and this course is highly interactive. All course readings, videos, notes, and other materials are posted online. You are required to read course material, and participate/post class discussions on a timely regular basis, according to posted instructions. Regular completion of reading assignments and participation in online discussions are essential to the course. In order to successfully complete this course, you must demonstrate your understanding of the material by:
Reading the required weekly text chapters and/or assigned articles
Watching the video lectures
Participating actively in the online asynchronous discussions and collaborating with your assigned group
Completing the two reflection assignments
Submitting a short paper
Writing a midterm paper and final paper
Here is an overview of all of the assignments in the course.
Online Discussions: Students will be divided into small groups and write and post in the discussion forums regularly throughout the term. Each discusses the main topic of the module, synthesizes the readings (300 words), and includes two replies to other students’ posts (100 words). One of the group members is required to record a 3-5 minute video to summarize the group discussion and share it with the entire class. The discussion activities provide students with an opportunity to deeply reflect on the readings assigned to each module and relate them to real-world situations. All of the posts on the discussion board are required to be thoughtful, reflective, and concise.
At the end of the semester, you will score your entire team, including yourself, based on the quality of each member’s contributions. Your instructor will average these scores and make any necessary adjustments to determine your Peer Evaluation grade.
Reflection Assignments: There are two reflection assignments in the course. The first reflection requires you to reflect on the difficulties in precisely defining sex. Your reflection should be 1-2 pages long (250-300 words), typed, and double-spaced. The second reflection requires you to tour an art exhibit or collection, either virtually or at a gallery or museum in your area. You should select an artwork whose representation of sexual orientation or erotic partnership in human life you find thought-provoking or compelling. You will prepare a 3-5 minute video presentation and share it with the class in a discussion forum.

 

 

Find a Q&A post that you would like to critique. After opening the thread and th

Find a Q&A post that you would like to critique. After opening the thread and thinking about the question and the answer, post your critique. To do this, click on the blue “Reply”
blue reply button, then enter your comments in the editing window that opens. Following this procedure allows for a very clear layout in the continuing discussion. No special format is required for your critical comments. Please take the time to review these helpful guidelines on Writing a Critique of Another Person’s Argument.
Remember that your goal here is not simply to agree or disagree with your peers’ answer to their question or to share some thoughts that the author’s post brings to mind from your own reading (although such peer comments may be part of your critique); what you should be attempting here is an analysis and evaluation of the entire Q&A discussion and any argumentation intended to defend the view they advance. Most students find it very challenging to critically evaluate either their own work as well as that of their peers.
Please note that your critique should be in the range of 200-400 words to be eligible for full credit
My question is:
Is the human Soul at Risk without God?
My answer to this question is:
In the Meditations on the First Philosophy by René Descartes “I have already slightly touched on these two questions of God and the human soul in the Discourse on the Method of rightly conducting the Reason and seeking truth in the Sciences, published in French in the year 1637.” Descartes spends an enormous amount of time meditating on the principals that are derived from the senses and hope that the soul could be saved if people live by the law of God and work through all the dubious thoughts and beliefs. For example, during the sleep states there are moments of disbelief and leave people uncertain about those things real and true. Reading through this piece caused emense struggling with the things that easily deceive those that want to know the true. Take the bible for example, it is easily said that bible could have been true primarily because the scriptures written/recorded and then passed on by credible sources year over year for centuries. This concept make the relation to God and the risk of losing your soul profound and motivates believers to do all that the scriptures say and never doubt the truth of the scriptures. Existence becomes more and more validated through life lessons past, present and future actions that are recorded and shared providing a very clear knowledge of the truth and this case the human soul is certainly at risk without a true God to lean on and seek the truth early and often. Meditation and thoughts while spent along inevitable afford the meditator to gravitate towards words, thoughts, and answers which are captured in the beliefs shared over many and many years.
Reference: In the Meditations on the First Philosophy by René Descartes- Preface to the People

 

 

Find a Q&A post that you would like to critique. After opening the thread and th

Find a Q&A post that you would like to critique. After opening the thread and thinking about the question and the answer, post your critique. To do this, click on the blue “Reply”
blue reply button, then enter your comments in the editing window that opens. Following this procedure allows for a very clear layout in the continuing discussion. No special format is required for your critical comments. Please take the time to review these helpful guidelines on Writing a Critique of Another Person’s Argument.
Remember that your goal here is not simply to agree or disagree with your peers’ answer to their question or to share some thoughts that the author’s post brings to mind from your own reading (although such peer comments may be part of your critique); what you should be attempting here is an analysis and evaluation of the entire Q&A discussion and any argumentation intended to defend the view they advance. Most students find it very challenging to critically evaluate either their own work as well as that of their peers.
Please note that your critique should be in the range of 200-400 words to be eligible for full credit
My question is:
Is the human Soul at Risk without God?
My answer to this question is:
In the Meditations on the First Philosophy by René Descartes “I have already slightly touched on these two questions of God and the human soul in the Discourse on the Method of rightly conducting the Reason and seeking truth in the Sciences, published in French in the year 1637.” Descartes spends an enormous amount of time meditating on the principals that are derived from the senses and hope that the soul could be saved if people live by the law of God and work through all the dubious thoughts and beliefs. For example, during the sleep states there are moments of disbelief and leave people uncertain about those things real and true. Reading through this piece caused emense struggling with the things that easily deceive those that want to know the true. Take the bible for example, it is easily said that bible could have been true primarily because the scriptures written/recorded and then passed on by credible sources year over year for centuries. This concept make the relation to God and the risk of losing your soul profound and motivates believers to do all that the scriptures say and never doubt the truth of the scriptures. Existence becomes more and more validated through life lessons past, present and future actions that are recorded and shared providing a very clear knowledge of the truth and this case the human soul is certainly at risk without a true God to lean on and seek the truth early and often. Meditation and thoughts while spent along inevitable afford the meditator to gravitate towards words, thoughts, and answers which are captured in the beliefs shared over many and many years.
Reference: In the Meditations on the First Philosophy by René Descartes- Preface to the People

 

 

Find a Q&A post that you would like to critique. After opening the thread and th

Find a Q&A post that you would like to critique. After opening the thread and thinking about the question and the answer, post your critique. To do this, click on the blue “Reply”
blue reply button, then enter your comments in the editing window that opens. Following this procedure allows for a very clear layout in the continuing discussion. No special format is required for your critical comments. Please take the time to review these helpful guidelines on Writing a Critique of Another Person’s Argument.
Remember that your goal here is not simply to agree or disagree with your peers’ answer to their question or to share some thoughts that the author’s post brings to mind from your own reading (although such peer comments may be part of your critique); what you should be attempting here is an analysis and evaluation of the entire Q&A discussion and any argumentation intended to defend the view they advance. Most students find it very challenging to critically evaluate either their own work as well as that of their peers.
Please note that your critique should be in the range of 200-400 words to be eligible for full credit
My question is:
Is the human Soul at Risk without God?
My answer to this question is:
In the Meditations on the First Philosophy by René Descartes “I have already slightly touched on these two questions of God and the human soul in the Discourse on the Method of rightly conducting the Reason and seeking truth in the Sciences, published in French in the year 1637.” Descartes spends an enormous amount of time meditating on the principals that are derived from the senses and hope that the soul could be saved if people live by the law of God and work through all the dubious thoughts and beliefs. For example, during the sleep states there are moments of disbelief and leave people uncertain about those things real and true. Reading through this piece caused emense struggling with the things that easily deceive those that want to know the true. Take the bible for example, it is easily said that bible could have been true primarily because the scriptures written/recorded and then passed on by credible sources year over year for centuries. This concept make the relation to God and the risk of losing your soul profound and motivates believers to do all that the scriptures say and never doubt the truth of the scriptures. Existence becomes more and more validated through life lessons past, present and future actions that are recorded and shared providing a very clear knowledge of the truth and this case the human soul is certainly at risk without a true God to lean on and seek the truth early and often. Meditation and thoughts while spent along inevitable afford the meditator to gravitate towards words, thoughts, and answers which are captured in the beliefs shared over many and many years.
Reference: In the Meditations on the First Philosophy by René Descartes- Preface to the People