Colonial and Postcolonial Identity of Korea

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1. It is the year 1910. The Japanese have just colonized Korea. The Koreans struggle to maintain their culture. The Japanese have banned the teaching of Korean language and history. Korean farmers have been driven from their lands while others must fulfill Japanese-imposed rice quotas for export to Japan. Buildings were commandeered for Japanese military and government use, and Korean businesses were turned over to Japanese officials.
You are a 24–year old student born and raised in Korea. Endowed with a scholarship from the Japanese government, you study Western-style painting in the Department of Painting at the renowned Tōkyō School of Fine Arts. As a privileged Korean student living in Japan, you have greater liberty and face less discrimination in the liberal atmosphere of Japan’s Taishō Era (1912-1926) than in your oppressed homeland of colonial Korea, which is under constant Japanese military surveillance. You find Tōkyō’s modern cultural scene fascinating: it is here where you can be trained in oil painting, a training not yet available in Korea. It is also in Tōkyō where you can go to public exhibitions to see original works of European painters such as Monet, Degas or van Gogh.
As part of your graduation work, you have been assigned to paint a self-portrait in oil on canvas in French academy style. You consider the following two options how to portray yourself: 1) You could portray yourself as a scholar in a traditional Korean outfit, thereby expressing your national identity and pride. 2) You could depict yourself as a modern-looking man with a short haircut (traditionally Korean men grew their hair long), indicating your identity as a modern artist.
Which manner of depicting yourself would you prefer and why? The two images attached to this unit exemplify the two options. They are self-portraits by Ko Hŭi-dong (1886-1965) and his Japanese teacher Nagahara Kōtarō (1864-1930).
2. After Korean independence in 1945, the Government-General Building continued to be used as the government office building of South Korea until 1985, when it became the National Museum of Korea. For many Koreans, this building symbolized Japanese colonial rule and the period of military regimes (1961 until mid-1990s). Others considered the building an important part of their cultural heritage and thus worthy of conservation. If you were a Korean, would you have supported the demolition of the building? What if anything else might you have done?

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Colonial and Postcolonial Identity of Korea

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

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ORDER NOW DISCOUNT CODE >>>> WELCOME40

 
1. It is the year 1910. The Japanese have just colonized Korea. The Koreans struggle to maintain their culture. The Japanese have banned the teaching of Korean language and history. Korean farmers have been driven from their lands while others must fulfill Japanese-imposed rice quotas for export to Japan. Buildings were commandeered for Japanese military and government use, and Korean businesses were turned over to Japanese officials.
You are a 24–year old student born and raised in Korea. Endowed with a scholarship from the Japanese government, you study Western-style painting in the Department of Painting at the renowned Tōkyō School of Fine Arts. As a privileged Korean student living in Japan, you have greater liberty and face less discrimination in the liberal atmosphere of Japan’s Taishō Era (1912-1926) than in your oppressed homeland of colonial Korea, which is under constant Japanese military surveillance. You find Tōkyō’s modern cultural scene fascinating: it is here where you can be trained in oil painting, a training not yet available in Korea. It is also in Tōkyō where you can go to public exhibitions to see original works of European painters such as Monet, Degas or van Gogh.
As part of your graduation work, you have been assigned to paint a self-portrait in oil on canvas in French academy style. You consider the following two options how to portray yourself: 1) You could portray yourself as a scholar in a traditional Korean outfit, thereby expressing your national identity and pride. 2) You could depict yourself as a modern-looking man with a short haircut (traditionally Korean men grew their hair long), indicating your identity as a modern artist.
Which manner of depicting yourself would you prefer and why? The two images attached to this unit exemplify the two options. They are self-portraits by Ko Hŭi-dong (1886-1965) and his Japanese teacher Nagahara Kōtarō (1864-1930).
2. After Korean independence in 1945, the Government-General Building continued to be used as the government office building of South Korea until 1985, when it became the National Museum of Korea. For many Koreans, this building symbolized Japanese colonial rule and the period of military regimes (1961 until mid-1990s). Others considered the building an important part of their cultural heritage and thus worthy of conservation. If you were a Korean, would you have supported the demolition of the building? What if anything else might you have done?

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

GET A 40% DISCOUNT ON YOU FIRST ORDER

ORDER NOW DISCOUNT CODE >>>> WELCOME40

 

 

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