Device-Free Time Is as Important as Work-Life Balance

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Learning outcomes Cite sources in writing using the proper citation and referencing style. Evaluate information critically from various sources to respond to a task. Synthesise information from various sources in writing in response to a given task. Develop a rhetorical structure of an essay. Apply persuasive argumentative writing strategies in response to a given task.
Question 1
Device-Free Time Is as Important as Work-Life Balance
By Charlotte Lieberman Harvard Buisness Review APRIL 13, 2017
– is an invention of the mid-19thcentury. The notion of
Today, when so much work and leisure time involve staring at screens, I see a different struggle arising: a struggle to find a healthy balance between technology and the physical 2016 survey from Deloitte found that Americans collectively check their phones 8 billion times per day. The average for individual Americans was 46 checks per day, including during leisure time watching TV, spending time with friends, eating dinner.
at all times. We carry our phones around everywhere as if they are epi-pens and we all have fatal allergies. Consider: two weeks ago, as I was beginning a consulting project at a midtown Manhattan corporate office, I found myself making a U-turn on the way to the restroom. I needed to go back to my office to pick up my cellphone, which I had inadvertently left behind. It was an unconscious decision to go back and get it, but my assumption was clear: I needed to take the phone with me to the bathroom. Was I going to make a clandestine call from a bathroom stall? No. Was I dealing with an urgent business matter? Fortunately not. So
know. But apparently 90% of us use our phones in the bathroom.
According to recent data from Nielsen, owning a smartphone, while a smaller but still substantial 68% of Americans own smartphones. A hefty 89% of American workers have reported feeling chronic body pain as a and 82% of this same group also say t Pew Global recently released a report about the correlation between smartphone use and economic growth, noting that the rates of technology-use are not only climbing steadily in advanced
SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (SUSS) 10
economies, but also in countries with emerging economies. As additional reference points, 39% of the Japanese population reports owning a smartphone, while 59% of Turkey reports relying on mobile internet use. These numbers decrease in developing countries, given the
and their access to technology.
But whether we are among those who use our devices to work remotely, or we are just obsessed with them because of the culture we live in regardless of how much time we are -body balance could look like.
I decided to launch a two-week, informal experiment to explore what tech-body balance might look like, even as I failed to embody it. I divided my experiments into three categories, based on three basic bodily needs:
Sleeping
For me and for many, the time in bed before sleep is a time to finally stop focusing on tasks to do and bask in feeling unfocused and empty-headed. For me, this means mindlessly scrolling through Instagram or Twitter to tire out my eyes until I am ready for sleep.
time limit. I gave myself five minutes, and they went by in one second. At the end of them, I felt annoyed by my self-imposed discipline and wanted to keep scrolling, even as I realized I had not learned anything new or even been entertained by the activity.
Sure, my work-life balance is fin (though yes, I have done that too). But what about my tech-body balance? My neck is strained while looking at my phone, my wrists tire from scrolling, and my attention is fully dedicated to my brightly lit device, rather than winding down for sleep.
needed. I tried using a real, old-fashioned alarm clock to wake myself up (rather than the alarm on my phone), and left my phone in the charger a short walk from my bed. Embarrassingly, this felt like a radical decision to make and you know what? It was. I
tire on their own.
Eating
Our bodies and minds need fuel to function properly, and eating food is what gives us fuel. Of course, eating can introduce complications like digestive malaise when stress is in the us, inhale my food while sitting at my computer writing emails, thinking about a million things at once.
I tried to stop staring at screens while I was eating, but honestly, it was hard. I was not able to make this a regular habit due to pragmatic concerns like a busy day or not enough time to eat lunch. But I tried it on several occasions, and that in itself felt illuminating.
What if you chose, once a week, to eat one meal alone without your phone or a computer nearby? It might feel unsettling, but you will feel your body, and you may find you are even able to eat more slowly, chew more carefully, and enjoy your food a lot more.
SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (SUSS) 10
Moving
Personally, I love talking on the phone while walking, and find that my ideas are more organic and free to arrive at my mind when I am on the move. I decided that my first experiment here would just be to walk during more of my phone calls, rather than take them seated at a desk, staring at a screen. Sure, you may be distracted by your surroundings while you are walking, but it is dynamic distraction that prevents you from looking at another
To try out something more radical, even scary (as much as I am embarrassed to admit it), I decided to take a walk the other afternoon during the work day, and very deliberately left my phone behind. More than usual, I felt little reminders pop into my head, tempting me to get my phone to jot it down in G-cal or in my Notes app. But instead, I had to experience the or simply forget and accept the consequences. It was uncomfortable to take this walk, particularly as I did it during a day when I felt stressed and busy at work. But of course, the counterintuitive wisdom I hoped for did arrive: the break from the stressors of my phone and computer gave me a sense of spaciousness and freedom, even though there were distinct moments of panic and disorientation. At one point, I reached into my pocket and felt the cortisol rush as I genuinely thought I lost my phone.
-body balance should behavioural shifts strike me as unsustainable and unproductive. Like work-life balance, finding tech-body balance is a constant experiment, and one that is different for everyone. tly a positive thing for each of us, and for the world we live in. But it is important to remember that we often do not need our phones with us, regardless of how much it may feel like we do.
Charlotte Lieberman is a New York-based writer and editor. Charlotte graduated Summa Cum Laude from Harvard University, where she majored in English. You can find her at @clieberwoman.
Source Link: https://hbr.org/2017/04/device-free-time-is-as-important-as-work-life-balance
SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (SUSS) 10
There has been much debate in the media with regard to the proliferation of smartphone use, especially in the context of achieving work-life balance. The two articles provided below reflect some of the debate regarding this issue.
The smartphone enables employees to achieve work-life balance. Do you agree or disagree with this claim?
In about 1000 words, write a persuasive argumentative essay defending your position in order to argue for your particular stance on this issue. Other than providing supporting arguments for the position you take on this issue, you MUST anticipate objections and provide counterarguments to write the paper. Relevant information for you to gather would be:
Definition of work-life balance Issues (health, economic, social, legal or etc.) surrounding the use of smartphones within the context of work-life balance Arguments for the use of smartphones within the context of achieving work-life balance Arguments against the use of smartphones within the context of achieving work-life balance
(100 marks)
Guidance Notes
1. Your reasoning must be good. 2. Strengthen your argument with relevant examples and illustrations. 3. You may include any additional but relevant information to the ideas that have already been given in the scenario and articles. 4. You should use at least 7 research sources to help you write your essay. The given articles are considered as a separate research source each and can count towards the 7 research sources. 5. You are to use credible and reliable sources to help you write this essay. Marks will be deducted for non-credible and unreliable content. 6. Remember to use accurate grammar, correct sentence structures and a tone appropriate to academic writing. Marks will be deducted for poor English.
The smartphone enables employees to achieve work-life balance. Do you agree or disagree with this claim?
SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (SUSS) 10
Article 1:
Are smartphones making our working lives more stressful? Some evidence suggests the encroachment of work on home life is creating more exhausted, cynical and burned out workers
Ian Sample, science editor
Thursday 18 September 2014 16.04 BST First published on Thursday 18 September 2014 16.04 BST
Are smartphones really so bad for us? Hard science on the matter is hard to come by. In the absence of solid evidence, debates on their effects are driven more by conjecture, anecdotes and surveys. Some studies, however, are starting to provide a few answers.
When companies hand out smartphones to their employees there is an implicit agreement that those staff are on call any time, any place. Once the workers are used to being connected to the office at all hours, it can be hard for them to detach and relax, says Arnold Bakker, a professor of work and organisational psychology at Erasmus University in Rotterdam.
In 2012, Bakker showed that heavy smartphone use caused more “work-home interference” that is, work encroached badly on home life. So far, so unsurprising, but he went on to show that this led to more burned-out employees, which manifested itself as exhaustion and cynicism. The smartphone had become a Trojan horse through which work infiltrated the home. “It seems difficult, if not impossible, for mobile users to maintain a satisfactory balance between their work and personal life,” he wrote in a 2012 report published in Applied Psychology.
The work was backed up by studies from Michigan State University. Researchers surveyed US workers and found that those who checked their smartphones for work reasons after 9pm were more tired and less engaged the next day. The tiredness came from their being mentally engaged late at night, and blue light from the screens might also affect their normal sleep patterns.
“Smartphones are almost perfectly designed to disrupt sleep,” Russell Johnson said when the work was published in January.
Christine Grant at Coventry University surveyed remote e-workers at 11 major UK companies. She found that the impact of mobile technology was very much down to the individual. Many found the technology helpful and that it allowed them to work more flexibly. Others suffered from the “always-on” culture, particularly frequent fliers who were contacted at all hours by colleagues in different time zones.
A Gallup poll in May found that stress levels in US workers were higher the more often they checked work emails on their smartphones out of normal hours. Nearly half who checked their emails frequently reported high stress levels, compared with around a third who never bothered.
SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (SUSS) 10
There was more to the data than that. Workers who emailed most outside work hours rated their lives better than those who did not. Though more stressed out, the emailers saw their behaviour as proof of professional success and accomplishment, Gallup speculated. In other words, emailing outside work hours gave people a sense of importance and status.
The rise of social media and its use through smartphones has spawned concerns that the gadgets are destroying our attention levels. That is an open question, which Imperial College researchers hope to answer in a three-year study launched this year. The study is the largest in the world to investigate whether mobile devices affect children’s cognitive development. It will look for the effects of electromagnetic radiation, but also of “brain training” through social media, gaming and the rest.
Is there any evidence that smartphones are harming our brains? The science is still in its infancy here. An Australian study of mobile phone users found that working memory was poorer, while reaction times improved. Whether the effects are real and arise from smartphone use might also be answered by the Imperial College study.
Other studies suggest that a reliance on mobile technology might change how our brains work. In 2010, researchers at McGill University in Montreal showed that a reliance on GPS might reduce activity in the hippocampus, a part of the brain we use to get from A to B. Another study, from Columbia University in New York, investigated the “Google effect” and found that people used computers as a substitute for their own memories.
Source Link: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/sep/18/smartphones-makingworking-lives-more-stressful
SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (SUSS) 10
Article 2:
Is technology really making our lives more stressful?
Posted by Benjamin Gran on March 3, 2015
PUBLISHED IN: EATON – POWERING BUSINESS WORLDWIDE
It’s become a popular cliché to say that “technology makes our lives more stressful.” Many people believe that social media, smartphones and the instant access nature of our modern information-driven society are making us all feel interrupted, distracted, frazzled, overwhelmed, and stressed-out. Lots of people are experimenting with and the National Day of Unplugging where they deliberately remove themselves from their online activities to stop and smell the roses and interact with people in real life. It seems that many people are uneasy about giving up too much power and influence to their smartphones online technology is doing to their attention spans and their sense of well-being.
But is it really true? Does technology actually make us more stressed? Or do our levels of stress just depend on how people choose to use the technology in their lives?
A new survey from the Pew Research [Centre], discussed in the New York Times, explores whether or not technology is actually making life more harried. The findings are surprising, and optimistic on the whole, technology can be harmful or helpful, but it appears that for the most part, today’s online technologies are making life easier, more efficient, and more organized.
feelings of stress:
Technology has No Effect on Stress Levels
The Pew Research [Centre] study surveyed a representative sample group of people and asked them a series of questions about their lives using a standard stress scale, and then they asked the people how frequently they used technology.
The study controlled for education levels, marital status, and other demographic factors basically, if technology makes us more stressed, we would expect to see more frequent technology users scoring higher on their stress levels.
However, the study found no statistically valid effect on stress levels among technology users. In fact, women who use e-mail, Twitter and photo-sharing apps more frequently actually scored 21 percent lower on the stress scale than women who do not use these technologies frequently.
Social Media Stress can be Contagious
However, frequent technology users are not stress free: the study found that social media, and Facebook in particular, tends to make people more aware of sad or traumatic events in
SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (SUSS) 10
the lives of close friends and this caused a noticeable increase in stress for the survey participants. This finding reinforces the psychological concept recently explored by other scientists that stress is contagious those same emotions, even if we are not directly involved. People tend to absorb the moods of their close relatives and friends, and seeing these feelings reflected on social media does not make us immune to their results.
people but not really getting the real-life benefits of friendship and in-person connection. Another study mentioned in The New York Times found that technological communication tools are often most effective at improving well-being when they are used to amplify healthy social engagement. A study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that children who talked with their mothers after a stressful situation showed decreased stress, while the children who only instant-messaged with their mothers remained at the same level of stress. Even though digital technology is great for exchanging information and conversing and getting to know more about other people, there is something simple-yet-powerful about the experience of in-person nonverbal communication that gives people added reassurance and lets people feel safe and connected.
Ultimately, every new wave of technological innovation brings benefits and disruptions
smartphones or checking our notifications on Facebook, and think that life was simpler and more peaceful back before these technologies existed but the truth is, we all have the option to unplug from online activities whenever we want, and yet many of us choose not these online technologies, for the most part despite the occa more connected, better-informed, and (ironically) less stressful.
Source Link: https://switchon.eaton.com/plug/article/451/is-technology-really-making-ourlives-more-s#
—– END OF COR160 TMA02 —-

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

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Posted in Uncategorized

Device-Free Time Is as Important as Work-Life Balance

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

GET A 40% DISCOUNT ON YOU FIRST ORDER

ORDER NOW DISCOUNT CODE >>>> WELCOME40

Learning outcomes Cite sources in writing using the proper citation and referencing style. Evaluate information critically from various sources to respond to a task. Synthesise information from various sources in writing in response to a given task. Develop a rhetorical structure of an essay. Apply persuasive argumentative writing strategies in response to a given task.
Question 1
Device-Free Time Is as Important as Work-Life Balance
By Charlotte Lieberman Harvard Buisness Review APRIL 13, 2017
– is an invention of the mid-19thcentury. The notion of
Today, when so much work and leisure time involve staring at screens, I see a different struggle arising: a struggle to find a healthy balance between technology and the physical 2016 survey from Deloitte found that Americans collectively check their phones 8 billion times per day. The average for individual Americans was 46 checks per day, including during leisure time watching TV, spending time with friends, eating dinner.
at all times. We carry our phones around everywhere as if they are epi-pens and we all have fatal allergies. Consider: two weeks ago, as I was beginning a consulting project at a midtown Manhattan corporate office, I found myself making a U-turn on the way to the restroom. I needed to go back to my office to pick up my cellphone, which I had inadvertently left behind. It was an unconscious decision to go back and get it, but my assumption was clear: I needed to take the phone with me to the bathroom. Was I going to make a clandestine call from a bathroom stall? No. Was I dealing with an urgent business matter? Fortunately not. So
know. But apparently 90% of us use our phones in the bathroom.
According to recent data from Nielsen, owning a smartphone, while a smaller but still substantial 68% of Americans own smartphones. A hefty 89% of American workers have reported feeling chronic body pain as a and 82% of this same group also say t Pew Global recently released a report about the correlation between smartphone use and economic growth, noting that the rates of technology-use are not only climbing steadily in advanced
SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (SUSS) 10
economies, but also in countries with emerging economies. As additional reference points, 39% of the Japanese population reports owning a smartphone, while 59% of Turkey reports relying on mobile internet use. These numbers decrease in developing countries, given the
and their access to technology.
But whether we are among those who use our devices to work remotely, or we are just obsessed with them because of the culture we live in regardless of how much time we are -body balance could look like.
I decided to launch a two-week, informal experiment to explore what tech-body balance might look like, even as I failed to embody it. I divided my experiments into three categories, based on three basic bodily needs:
Sleeping
For me and for many, the time in bed before sleep is a time to finally stop focusing on tasks to do and bask in feeling unfocused and empty-headed. For me, this means mindlessly scrolling through Instagram or Twitter to tire out my eyes until I am ready for sleep.
time limit. I gave myself five minutes, and they went by in one second. At the end of them, I felt annoyed by my self-imposed discipline and wanted to keep scrolling, even as I realized I had not learned anything new or even been entertained by the activity.
Sure, my work-life balance is fin (though yes, I have done that too). But what about my tech-body balance? My neck is strained while looking at my phone, my wrists tire from scrolling, and my attention is fully dedicated to my brightly lit device, rather than winding down for sleep.
needed. I tried using a real, old-fashioned alarm clock to wake myself up (rather than the alarm on my phone), and left my phone in the charger a short walk from my bed. Embarrassingly, this felt like a radical decision to make and you know what? It was. I
tire on their own.
Eating
Our bodies and minds need fuel to function properly, and eating food is what gives us fuel. Of course, eating can introduce complications like digestive malaise when stress is in the us, inhale my food while sitting at my computer writing emails, thinking about a million things at once.
I tried to stop staring at screens while I was eating, but honestly, it was hard. I was not able to make this a regular habit due to pragmatic concerns like a busy day or not enough time to eat lunch. But I tried it on several occasions, and that in itself felt illuminating.
What if you chose, once a week, to eat one meal alone without your phone or a computer nearby? It might feel unsettling, but you will feel your body, and you may find you are even able to eat more slowly, chew more carefully, and enjoy your food a lot more.
SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (SUSS) 10
Moving
Personally, I love talking on the phone while walking, and find that my ideas are more organic and free to arrive at my mind when I am on the move. I decided that my first experiment here would just be to walk during more of my phone calls, rather than take them seated at a desk, staring at a screen. Sure, you may be distracted by your surroundings while you are walking, but it is dynamic distraction that prevents you from looking at another
To try out something more radical, even scary (as much as I am embarrassed to admit it), I decided to take a walk the other afternoon during the work day, and very deliberately left my phone behind. More than usual, I felt little reminders pop into my head, tempting me to get my phone to jot it down in G-cal or in my Notes app. But instead, I had to experience the or simply forget and accept the consequences. It was uncomfortable to take this walk, particularly as I did it during a day when I felt stressed and busy at work. But of course, the counterintuitive wisdom I hoped for did arrive: the break from the stressors of my phone and computer gave me a sense of spaciousness and freedom, even though there were distinct moments of panic and disorientation. At one point, I reached into my pocket and felt the cortisol rush as I genuinely thought I lost my phone.
-body balance should behavioural shifts strike me as unsustainable and unproductive. Like work-life balance, finding tech-body balance is a constant experiment, and one that is different for everyone. tly a positive thing for each of us, and for the world we live in. But it is important to remember that we often do not need our phones with us, regardless of how much it may feel like we do.
Charlotte Lieberman is a New York-based writer and editor. Charlotte graduated Summa Cum Laude from Harvard University, where she majored in English. You can find her at @clieberwoman.
Source Link: https://hbr.org/2017/04/device-free-time-is-as-important-as-work-life-balance
SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (SUSS) 10
There has been much debate in the media with regard to the proliferation of smartphone use, especially in the context of achieving work-life balance. The two articles provided below reflect some of the debate regarding this issue.
The smartphone enables employees to achieve work-life balance. Do you agree or disagree with this claim?
In about 1000 words, write a persuasive argumentative essay defending your position in order to argue for your particular stance on this issue. Other than providing supporting arguments for the position you take on this issue, you MUST anticipate objections and provide counterarguments to write the paper. Relevant information for you to gather would be:
Definition of work-life balance Issues (health, economic, social, legal or etc.) surrounding the use of smartphones within the context of work-life balance Arguments for the use of smartphones within the context of achieving work-life balance Arguments against the use of smartphones within the context of achieving work-life balance
(100 marks)
Guidance Notes
1. Your reasoning must be good. 2. Strengthen your argument with relevant examples and illustrations. 3. You may include any additional but relevant information to the ideas that have already been given in the scenario and articles. 4. You should use at least 7 research sources to help you write your essay. The given articles are considered as a separate research source each and can count towards the 7 research sources. 5. You are to use credible and reliable sources to help you write this essay. Marks will be deducted for non-credible and unreliable content. 6. Remember to use accurate grammar, correct sentence structures and a tone appropriate to academic writing. Marks will be deducted for poor English.
The smartphone enables employees to achieve work-life balance. Do you agree or disagree with this claim?
SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (SUSS) 10
Article 1:
Are smartphones making our working lives more stressful? Some evidence suggests the encroachment of work on home life is creating more exhausted, cynical and burned out workers
Ian Sample, science editor
Thursday 18 September 2014 16.04 BST First published on Thursday 18 September 2014 16.04 BST
Are smartphones really so bad for us? Hard science on the matter is hard to come by. In the absence of solid evidence, debates on their effects are driven more by conjecture, anecdotes and surveys. Some studies, however, are starting to provide a few answers.
When companies hand out smartphones to their employees there is an implicit agreement that those staff are on call any time, any place. Once the workers are used to being connected to the office at all hours, it can be hard for them to detach and relax, says Arnold Bakker, a professor of work and organisational psychology at Erasmus University in Rotterdam.
In 2012, Bakker showed that heavy smartphone use caused more “work-home interference” that is, work encroached badly on home life. So far, so unsurprising, but he went on to show that this led to more burned-out employees, which manifested itself as exhaustion and cynicism. The smartphone had become a Trojan horse through which work infiltrated the home. “It seems difficult, if not impossible, for mobile users to maintain a satisfactory balance between their work and personal life,” he wrote in a 2012 report published in Applied Psychology.
The work was backed up by studies from Michigan State University. Researchers surveyed US workers and found that those who checked their smartphones for work reasons after 9pm were more tired and less engaged the next day. The tiredness came from their being mentally engaged late at night, and blue light from the screens might also affect their normal sleep patterns.
“Smartphones are almost perfectly designed to disrupt sleep,” Russell Johnson said when the work was published in January.
Christine Grant at Coventry University surveyed remote e-workers at 11 major UK companies. She found that the impact of mobile technology was very much down to the individual. Many found the technology helpful and that it allowed them to work more flexibly. Others suffered from the “always-on” culture, particularly frequent fliers who were contacted at all hours by colleagues in different time zones.
A Gallup poll in May found that stress levels in US workers were higher the more often they checked work emails on their smartphones out of normal hours. Nearly half who checked their emails frequently reported high stress levels, compared with around a third who never bothered.
SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (SUSS) 10
There was more to the data than that. Workers who emailed most outside work hours rated their lives better than those who did not. Though more stressed out, the emailers saw their behaviour as proof of professional success and accomplishment, Gallup speculated. In other words, emailing outside work hours gave people a sense of importance and status.
The rise of social media and its use through smartphones has spawned concerns that the gadgets are destroying our attention levels. That is an open question, which Imperial College researchers hope to answer in a three-year study launched this year. The study is the largest in the world to investigate whether mobile devices affect children’s cognitive development. It will look for the effects of electromagnetic radiation, but also of “brain training” through social media, gaming and the rest.
Is there any evidence that smartphones are harming our brains? The science is still in its infancy here. An Australian study of mobile phone users found that working memory was poorer, while reaction times improved. Whether the effects are real and arise from smartphone use might also be answered by the Imperial College study.
Other studies suggest that a reliance on mobile technology might change how our brains work. In 2010, researchers at McGill University in Montreal showed that a reliance on GPS might reduce activity in the hippocampus, a part of the brain we use to get from A to B. Another study, from Columbia University in New York, investigated the “Google effect” and found that people used computers as a substitute for their own memories.
Source Link: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/sep/18/smartphones-makingworking-lives-more-stressful
SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (SUSS) 10
Article 2:
Is technology really making our lives more stressful?
Posted by Benjamin Gran on March 3, 2015
PUBLISHED IN: EATON – POWERING BUSINESS WORLDWIDE
It’s become a popular cliché to say that “technology makes our lives more stressful.” Many people believe that social media, smartphones and the instant access nature of our modern information-driven society are making us all feel interrupted, distracted, frazzled, overwhelmed, and stressed-out. Lots of people are experimenting with and the National Day of Unplugging where they deliberately remove themselves from their online activities to stop and smell the roses and interact with people in real life. It seems that many people are uneasy about giving up too much power and influence to their smartphones online technology is doing to their attention spans and their sense of well-being.
But is it really true? Does technology actually make us more stressed? Or do our levels of stress just depend on how people choose to use the technology in their lives?
A new survey from the Pew Research [Centre], discussed in the New York Times, explores whether or not technology is actually making life more harried. The findings are surprising, and optimistic on the whole, technology can be harmful or helpful, but it appears that for the most part, today’s online technologies are making life easier, more efficient, and more organized.
feelings of stress:
Technology has No Effect on Stress Levels
The Pew Research [Centre] study surveyed a representative sample group of people and asked them a series of questions about their lives using a standard stress scale, and then they asked the people how frequently they used technology.
The study controlled for education levels, marital status, and other demographic factors basically, if technology makes us more stressed, we would expect to see more frequent technology users scoring higher on their stress levels.
However, the study found no statistically valid effect on stress levels among technology users. In fact, women who use e-mail, Twitter and photo-sharing apps more frequently actually scored 21 percent lower on the stress scale than women who do not use these technologies frequently.
Social Media Stress can be Contagious
However, frequent technology users are not stress free: the study found that social media, and Facebook in particular, tends to make people more aware of sad or traumatic events in
SINGAPORE UNIVERSITY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (SUSS) 10
the lives of close friends and this caused a noticeable increase in stress for the survey participants. This finding reinforces the psychological concept recently explored by other scientists that stress is contagious those same emotions, even if we are not directly involved. People tend to absorb the moods of their close relatives and friends, and seeing these feelings reflected on social media does not make us immune to their results.
people but not really getting the real-life benefits of friendship and in-person connection. Another study mentioned in The New York Times found that technological communication tools are often most effective at improving well-being when they are used to amplify healthy social engagement. A study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that children who talked with their mothers after a stressful situation showed decreased stress, while the children who only instant-messaged with their mothers remained at the same level of stress. Even though digital technology is great for exchanging information and conversing and getting to know more about other people, there is something simple-yet-powerful about the experience of in-person nonverbal communication that gives people added reassurance and lets people feel safe and connected.
Ultimately, every new wave of technological innovation brings benefits and disruptions
smartphones or checking our notifications on Facebook, and think that life was simpler and more peaceful back before these technologies existed but the truth is, we all have the option to unplug from online activities whenever we want, and yet many of us choose not these online technologies, for the most part despite the occa more connected, better-informed, and (ironically) less stressful.
Source Link: https://switchon.eaton.com/plug/article/451/is-technology-really-making-ourlives-more-s#
—– END OF COR160 TMA02 —-

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

GET A 40% DISCOUNT ON YOU FIRST ORDER

ORDER NOW DISCOUNT CODE >>>> WELCOME40

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized