Documented Argumentation Essay

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Purpose:
To write a documented essay, 8 to 10 pages in length, defending your position on an arguable social, historical, scientific, literary, or religious topic. You are free to choose topics discussed in or designated as a part of other classes and to use this paper for another class as well as for English class, as long as your other instructor is agreeable to this practice and as long as your paper meets the criteria for this class. Make sure you talk to both instructors before submitting a paper for more than one class. Note that many colleges forbid using a paper for more than one class; some instructors at Garrett College permit this practice only in conjunction with English 101 as a part of Writing Across the Curriculum. You must follow MLA guidelines in citing works within the body of your paper and in creating a Works Cited page, as outlined in your textbook and our discussions, or you will receive an F on this paper for this class.
 
Objectives:

  • To write a clear thesis that identifies an arguable topic, that tightly controls the content of your paper, and that clearly states your position on the topic (without making a formal announcement).
  • To blend effectively multiple rhetorical modes in supporting your argument.
  • To incorporate smoothly and effectively summarized, paraphrased, and quoted information from a minimum of five scholarly sources. (Use no more than four short quotes. Also, if you use a block quote, use no more than one of them, with a maximum length of 8 typed lines.)
  • To create a formal topic outline and MLA Works Cited page to support your research and writing efforts.
  • To use logical claims, supporting details, and patterns of development to support your argument.

 
Introduction:
As always, get your readers’ attention. Provide any necessary background information your reader might need to understand this topic and your position. Lead into your arguable thesis statement, clearly indicating your position. Why do you hold this position? Because….? Answering the because question will help introduce the reader to your subtopics and the patterns of development you plan to use.
I strongly encourage you to use your cause/effect paper as a springboard for this paper. By using the same topic, making your thesis arguable, adding more details, and adding a discussion of the opposing viewpoint and refutation of it, you can save yourself a great deal of time and work. Meet with me individually if you need assistance in making this transition.
 
Body:
Support each subtopic (Think of them as mini-arguments) with plenty of evidence to support your claims. In addition to your own logic and experiences, use source information—facts, statistics, opinions of authorities, case studies, results of experiments and surveys, etc. Remember—immediately after you use information or an idea from a source, insert a parenthetical citation, minimally, author and page number or in the absence of author, a brief chunk of an article title.
 
Opposing Viewpoints and Refutation:
This is something you haven’t done in other essays. Because every argument has two sides, you must indicate you are being fair by considering the views with which you disagree. The point is to indicate that you are aware of these views and that you are aware there is some evidence that disputes what you are saying, but now the refutation comes into play. Show the weakness in the opposing viewpoint and indicate why your position is more logical or stronger. Cite additional evidence to support your view. Sometimes you might not be able to refute a point made by the opposition. In that case, give them the point and move on, strengthening your own argument. At least you illustrate your own open-mindedness and fairness by showing that you are considering the opposition.
When refuting the opposition, you can either deal with opposing views all at once (block organization) or deal with opposing views and their refutation in response to each of your major points (alternating pattern of organization).
 
Conclusion:
This type of paper may require more than one paragraph to summarize your main points, to reiterate your thesis, and to leave your reader with a lasting impression. Just remember that the strongest argument loses its punch if the writer fails to deliver a strong conclusion. Use any method that works for you and that keeps your argument forceful and persuasive. Review the types of conclusions used by other writers, and use the type of conclusion you find most suitable.
 
Revision Checklist:

  • Do you use the introduction to lead effectively into the material?
  • Do you fulfill the promise of your thesis statement?
  • Do you answer the important questions you set out to answer in your research?
  • Do you stay on topic?
  • Do your ideas follow sensibly and logically from one to another?
  • Do you avoid bogging the paper down with irrelevant or insignificant information?
  • Do you avoid leaving gaps in information?
  • Do you integrate source material well without plagiarizing?
  • Do you use quotations, paraphrases, and summaries accurately and in a way that strengthens your thesis?
  • Have you taken into account the opposing view to your position?
  • Do you use the conclusion to end your argument effectively and to leave your reader with a lasting impression of the significance of your topic and of why your position is logical?

 
 
A note of caution:
            This paper is NOT a personal narrative. Write in third person, using personal examples extremely sparingly. You may use first person narrative (I, we) for the rare personal example, but you must support your assertions with material you have researched.
 
Allow enough time to write multiple drafts and to proofread carefully. Visit the Writing Center and talk to your instructor frequently. Ask multiple readers to read your paper aloud, carefully looking for errors in syntax (word order and sense), punctuation, and source citations. Make sure the voice coming through is yours.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

English 101 Argumentative Research Essay Rubric
  Extraordinary Accomplished Competent Unsatisfactory Score
Thesis Clearly stated and appropriately focused
(30)
Clearly stated but focus could have been sharper
(25)
Stated but not appropriately focused
(20)
No statement of thesis or objective for research
(10)
 
Legs of the argument All are carefully crafted and relate directly to the thesis
(40)
All are carefully crafted and most relate directly to the thesis
(35)
Most are carefully crafted but some do not relate directly to the thesis
(30)
Some are not carefully crafted, and some do not relate to the thesis
(20)
 
Quality of proof or support Proof/support
clearly relates
to the main points and is significant and varied
(30)
Proof/support clearly relates to the main points and is adequate
(25)
Proof/support sometimes relates to the main points and is usually adequate
(20)
Proof has little or nothing to do with the main points and is missing in places
(10)
 
Organization Information is very organized and main points connect well to each other.  The argument is built carefully
(40)
Information is organized and main points connect together most of the time.  The argument builds with clarity
(35)
Information is organized but the main points do not always lead into each other and do not always help to build the argument
(30)
The information appears to be disorganized and some points do not connect well together
(20)
 
Documentation of Sources/Works Cited Five or more sources are used and are accurately documented in MLA format within the text and the Works Cited.  Sources are important, ample, varied.
(30)
All sources are accurately documented within the text and the Works Cited, but some are not in MLA format.
(25)
Fewer than five sources are used. Some sources are not accurately documented or in MLA format.
(20)
Most sources are not accurately documented or in MLA format
(10)
 
Mechanics No grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors
(30)
Almost no grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors
(25)
A few grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors
(20)
Many grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors
(10)
 

 
 
Student Name _____________________________________
 
Date _______________               Score _______/200
 

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

GET A 40% DISCOUNT ON YOU FIRST ORDER

ORDER NOW DISCOUNT CODE >>>> WELCOME40

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized

Documented Argumentation Essay

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

GET A 40% DISCOUNT ON YOU FIRST ORDER

ORDER NOW DISCOUNT CODE >>>> WELCOME40

Purpose:
To write a documented essay, 8 to 10 pages in length, defending your position on an arguable social, historical, scientific, literary, or religious topic. You are free to choose topics discussed in or designated as a part of other classes and to use this paper for another class as well as for English class, as long as your other instructor is agreeable to this practice and as long as your paper meets the criteria for this class. Make sure you talk to both instructors before submitting a paper for more than one class. Note that many colleges forbid using a paper for more than one class; some instructors at Garrett College permit this practice only in conjunction with English 101 as a part of Writing Across the Curriculum. You must follow MLA guidelines in citing works within the body of your paper and in creating a Works Cited page, as outlined in your textbook and our discussions, or you will receive an F on this paper for this class.
 
Objectives:

  • To write a clear thesis that identifies an arguable topic, that tightly controls the content of your paper, and that clearly states your position on the topic (without making a formal announcement).
  • To blend effectively multiple rhetorical modes in supporting your argument.
  • To incorporate smoothly and effectively summarized, paraphrased, and quoted information from a minimum of five scholarly sources. (Use no more than four short quotes. Also, if you use a block quote, use no more than one of them, with a maximum length of 8 typed lines.)
  • To create a formal topic outline and MLA Works Cited page to support your research and writing efforts.
  • To use logical claims, supporting details, and patterns of development to support your argument.

 
Introduction:
As always, get your readers’ attention. Provide any necessary background information your reader might need to understand this topic and your position. Lead into your arguable thesis statement, clearly indicating your position. Why do you hold this position? Because….? Answering the because question will help introduce the reader to your subtopics and the patterns of development you plan to use.
I strongly encourage you to use your cause/effect paper as a springboard for this paper. By using the same topic, making your thesis arguable, adding more details, and adding a discussion of the opposing viewpoint and refutation of it, you can save yourself a great deal of time and work. Meet with me individually if you need assistance in making this transition.
 
Body:
Support each subtopic (Think of them as mini-arguments) with plenty of evidence to support your claims. In addition to your own logic and experiences, use source information—facts, statistics, opinions of authorities, case studies, results of experiments and surveys, etc. Remember—immediately after you use information or an idea from a source, insert a parenthetical citation, minimally, author and page number or in the absence of author, a brief chunk of an article title.
 
Opposing Viewpoints and Refutation:
This is something you haven’t done in other essays. Because every argument has two sides, you must indicate you are being fair by considering the views with which you disagree. The point is to indicate that you are aware of these views and that you are aware there is some evidence that disputes what you are saying, but now the refutation comes into play. Show the weakness in the opposing viewpoint and indicate why your position is more logical or stronger. Cite additional evidence to support your view. Sometimes you might not be able to refute a point made by the opposition. In that case, give them the point and move on, strengthening your own argument. At least you illustrate your own open-mindedness and fairness by showing that you are considering the opposition.
When refuting the opposition, you can either deal with opposing views all at once (block organization) or deal with opposing views and their refutation in response to each of your major points (alternating pattern of organization).
 
Conclusion:
This type of paper may require more than one paragraph to summarize your main points, to reiterate your thesis, and to leave your reader with a lasting impression. Just remember that the strongest argument loses its punch if the writer fails to deliver a strong conclusion. Use any method that works for you and that keeps your argument forceful and persuasive. Review the types of conclusions used by other writers, and use the type of conclusion you find most suitable.
 
Revision Checklist:

  • Do you use the introduction to lead effectively into the material?
  • Do you fulfill the promise of your thesis statement?
  • Do you answer the important questions you set out to answer in your research?
  • Do you stay on topic?
  • Do your ideas follow sensibly and logically from one to another?
  • Do you avoid bogging the paper down with irrelevant or insignificant information?
  • Do you avoid leaving gaps in information?
  • Do you integrate source material well without plagiarizing?
  • Do you use quotations, paraphrases, and summaries accurately and in a way that strengthens your thesis?
  • Have you taken into account the opposing view to your position?
  • Do you use the conclusion to end your argument effectively and to leave your reader with a lasting impression of the significance of your topic and of why your position is logical?

 
 
A note of caution:
            This paper is NOT a personal narrative. Write in third person, using personal examples extremely sparingly. You may use first person narrative (I, we) for the rare personal example, but you must support your assertions with material you have researched.
 
Allow enough time to write multiple drafts and to proofread carefully. Visit the Writing Center and talk to your instructor frequently. Ask multiple readers to read your paper aloud, carefully looking for errors in syntax (word order and sense), punctuation, and source citations. Make sure the voice coming through is yours.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

English 101 Argumentative Research Essay Rubric
  Extraordinary Accomplished Competent Unsatisfactory Score
Thesis Clearly stated and appropriately focused
(30)
Clearly stated but focus could have been sharper
(25)
Stated but not appropriately focused
(20)
No statement of thesis or objective for research
(10)
 
Legs of the argument All are carefully crafted and relate directly to the thesis
(40)
All are carefully crafted and most relate directly to the thesis
(35)
Most are carefully crafted but some do not relate directly to the thesis
(30)
Some are not carefully crafted, and some do not relate to the thesis
(20)
 
Quality of proof or support Proof/support
clearly relates
to the main points and is significant and varied
(30)
Proof/support clearly relates to the main points and is adequate
(25)
Proof/support sometimes relates to the main points and is usually adequate
(20)
Proof has little or nothing to do with the main points and is missing in places
(10)
 
Organization Information is very organized and main points connect well to each other.  The argument is built carefully
(40)
Information is organized and main points connect together most of the time.  The argument builds with clarity
(35)
Information is organized but the main points do not always lead into each other and do not always help to build the argument
(30)
The information appears to be disorganized and some points do not connect well together
(20)
 
Documentation of Sources/Works Cited Five or more sources are used and are accurately documented in MLA format within the text and the Works Cited.  Sources are important, ample, varied.
(30)
All sources are accurately documented within the text and the Works Cited, but some are not in MLA format.
(25)
Fewer than five sources are used. Some sources are not accurately documented or in MLA format.
(20)
Most sources are not accurately documented or in MLA format
(10)
 
Mechanics No grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors
(30)
Almost no grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors
(25)
A few grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors
(20)
Many grammatical, spelling or punctuation errors
(10)
 

 
 
Student Name _____________________________________
 
Date _______________               Score _______/200
 

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

GET A 40% DISCOUNT ON YOU FIRST ORDER

ORDER NOW DISCOUNT CODE >>>> WELCOME40

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized