Following the appropriate format, write a personal narrative whose theme is rela

Following the appropriate format, write a personal narrative whose theme is rela

Following the appropriate format, write a personal narrative whose theme is related to one of Benjamin Franklin’s aphorisms (sayings).
You will find the list of sayings at the bottom of this page.
You must refer to the saying you chose by Benjamin Franklin as part of the grabber, as a part of the narrative’s plot, or at the end of your narrative as part of the take-away. Be creative in how you incorporate the saying in your narrative.
Your final submission should include 1 title page + 2 pages of 12 pt. Times New Roman font typed, double spaced personal narrative.
Your personal narrative must include the following elements:
The personal narrative describes a story that happened to you personally. You are the main character and narrator, so the story is told in the first person.
The theme is based on one of Benjamin Franklin’s sayings.
The story follows narrative plot structure.
Dialogue is included and is properly formatted.
Descriptive elements have been crafted and are appropriate for the narrative
Benjamin Franklin’s Aphorisms (Sayings) to Choose From:
The Poor Richard’s Almanack was written by Benjamin Franklin from 1732-1758. He wrote it under the pseudonym of “Poor Richard” or “Richard Saunders.” The print runs reached upwards of 10,000 per year.
Select one of the following sayings, and base the theme of your personal narrative on it. You will be expected to creatively include Benjamin Franklin’s saying somewhere in your narrative.
There are no gains without pains.
Diligence is the mother of good luck.
One today is worth two tomorrows.
Keep thy shop and thy shop will keep thee.
To be humble to superiors is duty, to equals courtesy, to inferiors nobleness.
The noblest question in the world is What good may I do in it?
Sell not virtue to purchase wealth nor liberty to purchase power.
Wink at small faults; remember thou hast great ones.
Hear no ill of a friend, nor speak any of an enemy.
Having been poor is no shame; but being ashamed of it is.
The busy man has few idle visitors; to the boiling pot the flies come not.
If you would reap praise you must sow the seeds, Gentle words and useful deeds.
Anger is never without a reason but seldom with a good one.
Love your neighbor Yet don’t pull down your hedge.
What you would seem to be, be really.
Tricks and treachery are the practice of fools that have not wit enough to be honest.
Words may shew a man’s wit but actions his meaning.
He that lies down with dogs shall rise up with fleas.
The sun never repents of the good he does, nor does he ever demand recompense.
Being ignorant is not so much a shame as being unwilling to learn.
Love your enemies, for they tell you your faults.
Fear to do evil and you need fear nothing else.
Who is strong? He that can conquer his bad habits. Who is rich? He that rejoices in his portion.
Wish not so much to live long as to live well.
Lend money to an enemy and you will gain him, to a friend and you will lose him.
Beware of little expenses, a small leak will sink a great ship.
He that is of the opinion money will do everything may well be suspected of doing everything for money.
Keep your eyes wide open before marriage, half shut afterwards.
Fish and visitors stink in three days.
Trust thyself and another shall not betray thee.
Most people return small favors, acknowledge middling ones, and repay great ones with ingratitude.
Where sense is wanting everything is wanting.
The wolf sheds his coat once a year, his disposition never.
How few there are who have courage enough to own their faults, or resolution enough to mend them.
An open foe may prove a curse but a pretended friend is worse.
When the well is dry, they know the worth of water.
If you will not hear and obey reason she will surely rap your knuckles.
No better relation than a prudent and faithful friend.
Who is rich? He that rejoices in his portion.
Wish not so much to live long, as to live well.
Tart words make no friends: a spoonful of honey will catch more flies than a gallon of vinegar.
The same man cannot be both friend and flatterer.
If you would keep your secret from an enemy, tell it not to a friend.
A lie stands on one leg, Truth on two.
Wise men learn by others’ harms; Fools by their own.
He that won’t be counselled, can’t be helped.
He that waits on fortune is never sure of a dinner.
A slip of the foot you may soon recover, but a slip of the tongue you may never get over.
Would you live with ease, do what you ought, not what you please.
Don’t throw stones at your neighbors, if your own windows are glass.
The honey is sweet, but the bee has a sting.
He that scatters thorns, let him not go barefoot.
‘Tis easier to suppress the first desire than to satisfy all that follow it.
The rotten apple spoils his companion.
‘Tis easier to prevent bad habits than to break them.
Hope of gain Lessens pain.
He that falls in love with himself, will have no Rivals.
Rather go to bed supperless, than run in debt for a Breakfast.
Let our Fathers and Grandfathers be valued for their Goodness, ourselves for our own.
Industry need not wish.
Sin is not hurtful because it is forbidden but it is forbidden because it’s hurtful. Nor is a Duty beneficial because it is commanded, but it is commanded, because it’s beneficial.
Love, and be lov’d.
Lazy-Bones! Dost thou think God would have given thee Arms and Legs, if he had not design’d thou should’st use them.
Employ thy time well, if thou meanest to gain leisure.
A true Friend is the best Possession.
Wars bring scars.
Vice knows she’s ugly, so puts on her Mask.
It’s the easiest Thing in the World for a Man to deceive himself.
Courage would fight, but Discretion won’t let him.
Write Injuries in Dust, Benefits in Marble.
The Devil sweetens Poison with Honey.
Genius without Education is like Silver in the Mine.
Fond Pride of Dress is sure an empty Curse; E’re Fancy you consult, consult your Purse.
Speak little, do much.
Half the truth is often a great lie.

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