In 2021-2022, scientists from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPC

In 2021-2022, scientists from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPC

In 2021-2022, scientists from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) sifted through thousands of studies and published their 6th Assessment Report (AR6). This report can be found here: https://www.ipcc.ch/assessment-report/ar6/Links to an external site.
A few points from the report:
Climate change is “widespread, rapid, and intensifying”
Warming of the atmosphere and ocean system is unequivocal.Many of the associated impacts such as sea level change (among other metrics) have occurred since 1950 at rates unprecedented in the historical record.
There is a clear human influence on the climate
It is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of observed warming since 1950 (the level of confidence in this statement has increased since the 4th report)
The longer we wait to reduce emissions, the more expensive it will become.
There have been promising new developments in low-carbon technologies.
In summary, the atmosphere and oceans are warmer, sea levels are rising and glaciers are melting, and there are more extreme weather events.
Finally, the IPCC makes the following predictions:Further warming will continue if emissions of greenhouse gases continue.
The global surface temperature increase by the end of the 21st century is likely to exceed 1.5 °C relative to the 1850 to 1900 period for most scenarios, and is likely to exceed 2.0 °C for many scenarios
The global water cycle will change, with increases in disparity between wet and dry regions, as well as wet and dry seasons, with some regional exceptions.
The oceans will continue to warm, with heat extending to the deep ocean, affecting circulation patterns.
Decreases are very likely in Arctic sea ice cover, Northern Hemisphere spring snow cover, and global glacier volume
Some of the changes already set in motion—such as continued sea level rise—are irreversible over hundreds to thousands of years
Global mean sea level will continue to rise at a rate very likely to exceed the rate of the past four decades
Changes in climate will cause an increase in the rate of CO2 production. Increased uptake by the oceans will increase the acidification of the oceans.
Future surface temperatures will be largely determined by cumulative CO2, which means climate change will continue even if CO2 emissions are stopped.
In a follow-up discussion, we will consider SOLUTIONS. For this discussion, choose a SPECIFIC example of a climate change impact (i.e. an specific agricultural crop whose range has shifted, a specific glacier in a specific location that has melted, a specific human impact, etc etc) and provide supporting data. You can refer to Chapter 10 for inspiration, or find a specific impact that was not mentioned in lecture. The key is that your example is supported by DATA (provide the source of the data in your discussion post) and is SPECIFIC.
A few sources worth considering:
https://climate.nasa.govLinks to an external site.
https://www.yaleclimateconnections.orgLinks to an external site.
http://www.who.int/globalchange/en/Links to an external site.
List of other journalistic sources on climate news: https://www.sej.org/library/climate-change/staying-up-to-date-publications-followLinks to an external site.

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