legalization of marijuana

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Due Date: March 29th, 2018             Points Worth: 15                    Page Requirement: 4-6
Exploratory Paper
You will be required to write a 4-6 page paper exploring the counter arguments to your stance on the previously selected topic. In this paper, you will ask a question surrounding the opposing view and explore the possible answers throughout the paper. Focus on presenting facts and outsides sources as possible answers, followed by your own analysis of the plausibility of each. Please include 2-3 outside sources for this paper. See the Checklist for Organizing an Exploratory Essay on page 212 for elements of Exploratory Essays. See calendar for due dates.
 
Paper Format
All papers should be double-spaced, in 12 point, Times New Roman font, with one inch margins. Always document sources throughout your paper carefully and accurately. Use MLA guidelines to document your sources (See Rules for Writers or the Purdue OWL link on Blackboard).
 
Things to Consider:
 
A Checklist for Organizing an Exploratory Essay (212)

  • Keep the following narrative structure in mind:
      • Begin with a truly difficult problem or question.
      • Explain the problem in the opening paragraphs.
      • Describe the journey of your quest for insight into the problem.
      • Dig deeper.
      • Explain the shifts in direction (for example, if the nature of the problem changes).
      • Highlight moments of insight or turning points.
      • Leave the reader with something to think about, such as an insight, a deeper appreciation of the question or problem, or a partial solution.

 
Comparing the Argument Essay to the Exploratory Essay:

  Argument Essay Exploratory Essay
Purpose To persuade the reader that an idea is valid To explore and deepen the reader’s understanding of the problem
Impetus Thesis-Driven Question-Driven
Structure Logical Structure Mostly Narrative Structure
Modes of Discourse Keeps primarily to argument mode Often combines several modes of discourse

 
 

Writing the Story of Your Quest

  • Begin with a problem for the writing assignment, the question you might be seeking to find questions for.
    • Write first to work toward a better understanding of the problem or question.
      • Then figure out ways to find answers.
        • What work does it entail?
          • Rereading?
          • Research?
          • Interviews?
          • A visit somewhere?
        • Keep a careful moment-to-moment record of your work.
        • At some point, you should come to a conclusion of some kind.
          • Maybe this isn’t an answer, but at least a point of view or even just a deeper understanding of the question.
        • Then write this up as a quest narrative:
          • Identify the key moments of the quest.
            • The missteps as well as the steps forward.
          • And shape your freewriting into a readerly essay.


  • An exploratory essay is structured as a narrative or a story.
    • Any question-driven essay will contain three elements:
      • A beginning.
      • A middle.
      • An end.
    • And since the story is your story, it will typically talk about you.
      • Therefore using the first person will probably help.
    • There is a chance the story contains several stories, as well as passages that reflect on the meaning or significance of those stores.
      • For example, in order to define the central problem or question of the essay, you may need to tell the story of how you came to realize there was need for answers.
        • A vivid account of the context or occasion of the problem is often essential to the reader’s understanding of why the question matters and is interesting.
      • The best exploratory essays tell good stories, ones that hold the reader’s interest and keep them reading even though they do not know what the outcome will be.
        • As you revise, bear in mind that the exploratory essay is not the quest itself, but rather a crafted narrative of the question.
        • You will need to select, shape, and organize your story so that it effectively takes readers down the path of ideas that you have traced.
      • Rogerian Rhetoric
        • Consider having a kind of dialogue with an opposing position and taking that other position seriously.
          • Attempt to seek common ground and understand the possible solutions through the other’s eyes.
            • This takes imagination and humility, but can be remarkably illuminating.
          • The first step is to present an opposing or differing viewpoint as it would be presented by someone who genuinely holds that view.
            • So make sure to explain the position of someone who might favor the other view fully like they might.
              • And limit your views or way of thinking till later.
            • The next step is to begin a kind of dialogue with the opposing position, to sort out the roots of your disagreement and find common ground.

              • Use caution when evaluating another’s views.
                • Have a reluctance to reject ideas or perspectives that may have some value.
              • A mere summary of the opposing argument is not enough.
                • You will need to work out where the argument’s strengths lie and why someone might find it persuasive or reasonable.

Question-Driven Paper

  1. Ask the question of the opposing view of your stance.
    1. Explore possible answers in your paper
    2. Discuss what the answers mean, how they apply, and what they could do for the argument.
    3. Take the reader on the journey of discover with you.

 

  • CHECKLIST FOR ORGANIZING AN XPLORATORY ESSAY (212)
    • Beginning
      • Begin with a truly difficult problem or question
      • Explain the problem in the opening paragraphs
    • Middle
      • Describe the journey of your quest for insight into the problem
      • Dig Deeper
      • Explain shifts in direction
      • Highlight moments of insight or turning points
    • End
      • Leave the reader with something to think about, such as an insight, a deeper appreciation of the question or problem, or a partial solution

 
 
 
 

  • CHECKLIST FOR ORGANIZING AN EXPLORATORY ESSAY (212)
    • Beginning
      • Begin with a truly difficult problem or question
        • Consider the opposing stance as this “difficult problem.”
          • Why would people think this way?
          • What answers might they be giving?
          • Why isn’t your stance accepted?
        • Examples of possible questions:
          • Original stance: We should drill in Alaska.
            • Questions:
              • Why aren’t we drilling in Alaska?
              • What reasons do people have for rejecting drilling in Alaska?
              • What are counterarguments to these specific reasons for drilling in Alaska?
            • Original stance: Marijuana should be legalized.
              • Questions:
                • Why is marijuana still illegal?
                • What has stopped marijuana from being legalized?
                • With knowledge of health benefits, what are people saying about marijuana to counter these known facts/claims?
              • Explain the problem in the opening paragraphs
                • Make sure you develop the reason for this questions in the introduction paragraph(s).
                  • What is the topic?
                  • What is the argument?
                  • What is the question?
                  • Why is this important?
                • You do not need to list possible answers here, as that will come later in the body paragraphs.
                • Examples of opening:
                  • Question: Why aren’t we drilling in Alaska?
                    • Mention:
                      • Drilling in Alaska.
                      • The debate over it.
                      • Why answers are needed.
                      • Possible benefits missed out on.
                    • Question: Why is marijuana still illegal?
                      • Mention:
                        • Its legality federally.
                        • The debate over it.
                        • Why answers are needed.
                        • Possible benefits missed out on.

 

  • Middle
    • Describe the journey of your quest for insight into the problem
      • Where did you go first to find answers?
        • Each source might get its own paragraph or “episode.”
          • Or each answer will get its own paragraph.
        • What are the answers you found?
          • How would believers on that side treat them?
        • Dig Deeper
          • What do the answers mean to the argument at hand?
            • Are they really possible answers to the question?
              • How would you analyze them on your side?
            • What concerns do you have about them?
              • Don’t be too critical, be fair.
            • Explain shifts in direction
              • Do not be afraid to mention dead ends.
                • If you thought something was possible and wasn’t.
                  • Talk about why this was and what it means.
                • Highlight moments of insight or turning points
                  • If something made you change your mind or surprised you.
                    • Explain what you saw and what changed you.
                      • Be fair and honest about these moments.
                    • If you think you found “the right answer,” say that.
                      • And explain why you think it could be that way.
                    • End
                      • Leave the reader with something to think about, such as an insight, a deeper appreciation of the question or problem, or a partial solution.
                        • Explain to the reader what the journey meant.
                          • Talk a little about a generalization of the possible answers you’ve found.
                            • Are they actually plausible?
                            • What does the number of answers tell you?
                            • Do you understand where people are coming from?
                          • Tell the reader what you learned.
                            • Talk a little about how your understanding of the question has changed over the course of the paper.
                              • Have your changed your mind?
                              • Do you understand that side better?
                              • Do you have more questions?
                            • If you think there’s a possible solution that works more so than others, talk about it.
                              • Which solution is it?
                                • Why might it work?
                                • Would it counter your argument?
                                • Is there more to learn?

 

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

GET A 40% DISCOUNT ON YOU FIRST ORDER

ORDER NOW DISCOUNT CODE >>>> WELCOME40

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized

legalization of marijuana

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

GET A 40% DISCOUNT ON YOU FIRST ORDER

ORDER NOW DISCOUNT CODE >>>> WELCOME40

Due Date: March 29th, 2018             Points Worth: 15                    Page Requirement: 4-6
Exploratory Paper
You will be required to write a 4-6 page paper exploring the counter arguments to your stance on the previously selected topic. In this paper, you will ask a question surrounding the opposing view and explore the possible answers throughout the paper. Focus on presenting facts and outsides sources as possible answers, followed by your own analysis of the plausibility of each. Please include 2-3 outside sources for this paper. See the Checklist for Organizing an Exploratory Essay on page 212 for elements of Exploratory Essays. See calendar for due dates.
 
Paper Format
All papers should be double-spaced, in 12 point, Times New Roman font, with one inch margins. Always document sources throughout your paper carefully and accurately. Use MLA guidelines to document your sources (See Rules for Writers or the Purdue OWL link on Blackboard).
 
Things to Consider:
 
A Checklist for Organizing an Exploratory Essay (212)

  • Keep the following narrative structure in mind:
      • Begin with a truly difficult problem or question.
      • Explain the problem in the opening paragraphs.
      • Describe the journey of your quest for insight into the problem.
      • Dig deeper.
      • Explain the shifts in direction (for example, if the nature of the problem changes).
      • Highlight moments of insight or turning points.
      • Leave the reader with something to think about, such as an insight, a deeper appreciation of the question or problem, or a partial solution.

 
Comparing the Argument Essay to the Exploratory Essay:

  Argument Essay Exploratory Essay
Purpose To persuade the reader that an idea is valid To explore and deepen the reader’s understanding of the problem
Impetus Thesis-Driven Question-Driven
Structure Logical Structure Mostly Narrative Structure
Modes of Discourse Keeps primarily to argument mode Often combines several modes of discourse

 
 

Writing the Story of Your Quest

  • Begin with a problem for the writing assignment, the question you might be seeking to find questions for.
    • Write first to work toward a better understanding of the problem or question.
      • Then figure out ways to find answers.
        • What work does it entail?
          • Rereading?
          • Research?
          • Interviews?
          • A visit somewhere?
        • Keep a careful moment-to-moment record of your work.
        • At some point, you should come to a conclusion of some kind.
          • Maybe this isn’t an answer, but at least a point of view or even just a deeper understanding of the question.
        • Then write this up as a quest narrative:
          • Identify the key moments of the quest.
            • The missteps as well as the steps forward.
          • And shape your freewriting into a readerly essay.


  • An exploratory essay is structured as a narrative or a story.
    • Any question-driven essay will contain three elements:
      • A beginning.
      • A middle.
      • An end.
    • And since the story is your story, it will typically talk about you.
      • Therefore using the first person will probably help.
    • There is a chance the story contains several stories, as well as passages that reflect on the meaning or significance of those stores.
      • For example, in order to define the central problem or question of the essay, you may need to tell the story of how you came to realize there was need for answers.
        • A vivid account of the context or occasion of the problem is often essential to the reader’s understanding of why the question matters and is interesting.
      • The best exploratory essays tell good stories, ones that hold the reader’s interest and keep them reading even though they do not know what the outcome will be.
        • As you revise, bear in mind that the exploratory essay is not the quest itself, but rather a crafted narrative of the question.
        • You will need to select, shape, and organize your story so that it effectively takes readers down the path of ideas that you have traced.
      • Rogerian Rhetoric
        • Consider having a kind of dialogue with an opposing position and taking that other position seriously.
          • Attempt to seek common ground and understand the possible solutions through the other’s eyes.
            • This takes imagination and humility, but can be remarkably illuminating.
          • The first step is to present an opposing or differing viewpoint as it would be presented by someone who genuinely holds that view.
            • So make sure to explain the position of someone who might favor the other view fully like they might.
              • And limit your views or way of thinking till later.
            • The next step is to begin a kind of dialogue with the opposing position, to sort out the roots of your disagreement and find common ground.

              • Use caution when evaluating another’s views.
                • Have a reluctance to reject ideas or perspectives that may have some value.
              • A mere summary of the opposing argument is not enough.
                • You will need to work out where the argument’s strengths lie and why someone might find it persuasive or reasonable.

Question-Driven Paper

  1. Ask the question of the opposing view of your stance.
    1. Explore possible answers in your paper
    2. Discuss what the answers mean, how they apply, and what they could do for the argument.
    3. Take the reader on the journey of discover with you.

 

  • CHECKLIST FOR ORGANIZING AN XPLORATORY ESSAY (212)
    • Beginning
      • Begin with a truly difficult problem or question
      • Explain the problem in the opening paragraphs
    • Middle
      • Describe the journey of your quest for insight into the problem
      • Dig Deeper
      • Explain shifts in direction
      • Highlight moments of insight or turning points
    • End
      • Leave the reader with something to think about, such as an insight, a deeper appreciation of the question or problem, or a partial solution

 
 
 
 

  • CHECKLIST FOR ORGANIZING AN EXPLORATORY ESSAY (212)
    • Beginning
      • Begin with a truly difficult problem or question
        • Consider the opposing stance as this “difficult problem.”
          • Why would people think this way?
          • What answers might they be giving?
          • Why isn’t your stance accepted?
        • Examples of possible questions:
          • Original stance: We should drill in Alaska.
            • Questions:
              • Why aren’t we drilling in Alaska?
              • What reasons do people have for rejecting drilling in Alaska?
              • What are counterarguments to these specific reasons for drilling in Alaska?
            • Original stance: Marijuana should be legalized.
              • Questions:
                • Why is marijuana still illegal?
                • What has stopped marijuana from being legalized?
                • With knowledge of health benefits, what are people saying about marijuana to counter these known facts/claims?
              • Explain the problem in the opening paragraphs
                • Make sure you develop the reason for this questions in the introduction paragraph(s).
                  • What is the topic?
                  • What is the argument?
                  • What is the question?
                  • Why is this important?
                • You do not need to list possible answers here, as that will come later in the body paragraphs.
                • Examples of opening:
                  • Question: Why aren’t we drilling in Alaska?
                    • Mention:
                      • Drilling in Alaska.
                      • The debate over it.
                      • Why answers are needed.
                      • Possible benefits missed out on.
                    • Question: Why is marijuana still illegal?
                      • Mention:
                        • Its legality federally.
                        • The debate over it.
                        • Why answers are needed.
                        • Possible benefits missed out on.

 

  • Middle
    • Describe the journey of your quest for insight into the problem
      • Where did you go first to find answers?
        • Each source might get its own paragraph or “episode.”
          • Or each answer will get its own paragraph.
        • What are the answers you found?
          • How would believers on that side treat them?
        • Dig Deeper
          • What do the answers mean to the argument at hand?
            • Are they really possible answers to the question?
              • How would you analyze them on your side?
            • What concerns do you have about them?
              • Don’t be too critical, be fair.
            • Explain shifts in direction
              • Do not be afraid to mention dead ends.
                • If you thought something was possible and wasn’t.
                  • Talk about why this was and what it means.
                • Highlight moments of insight or turning points
                  • If something made you change your mind or surprised you.
                    • Explain what you saw and what changed you.
                      • Be fair and honest about these moments.
                    • If you think you found “the right answer,” say that.
                      • And explain why you think it could be that way.
                    • End
                      • Leave the reader with something to think about, such as an insight, a deeper appreciation of the question or problem, or a partial solution.
                        • Explain to the reader what the journey meant.
                          • Talk a little about a generalization of the possible answers you’ve found.
                            • Are they actually plausible?
                            • What does the number of answers tell you?
                            • Do you understand where people are coming from?
                          • Tell the reader what you learned.
                            • Talk a little about how your understanding of the question has changed over the course of the paper.
                              • Have your changed your mind?
                              • Do you understand that side better?
                              • Do you have more questions?
                            • If you think there’s a possible solution that works more so than others, talk about it.
                              • Which solution is it?
                                • Why might it work?
                                • Would it counter your argument?
                                • Is there more to learn?

 

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

GET A 40% DISCOUNT ON YOU FIRST ORDER

ORDER NOW DISCOUNT CODE >>>> WELCOME40

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized