Museum observation paper

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technically due at 11:59pm please!!
I added the prompt on the bottom. It’s a paper on observations of going to the Rosecrucian musuem in san jose, ca. I went but had no time to write this report due to family illness and would appreciate your help so much!
The four works i chose that were in the musuem were the:
1. The coffin of king tutankhamun
2. The rosetta stone
3. The bust of nefertiti
4. Law code of hammurabi
You could look up these objects at the rosicrucian museum so you could describe them better!FIELD STUDY REPORT: Ancient to Gothic Survey I All students are strongly urged to attend this exceptional opportunity as viewing original works of art is of primary concern. You will visit a Museum, enjoy yourself and write a 1200 to 1400 word report (1300 words required for consideration of an ‘A’ grade. It is suggested that you first write at least 1500 words and edit the material down to the required length, rather than working from the perspective of only filling the required space. (using 12 point Times New Roman font, double-spaced) Please include a cover sheet. This is not a research paper! I am interested in what you see and how it relates directly to the specific period of our studies. After selecting the works, develop a thesis topic that brings them together. The thesis can be as simple as comparing the formal characteristics of the works to each other or to works we have discussed in class. APPROACH TO THE REPORT: Select FOUR or FIVE works (paintings, sculptures, drawing, prints or architectural models) from at least two different periods that you feel are good representations of styles or artists that we have or will discuss in this class. No library research is required for this assignment, but you are encouraged to consult your textbooks for basic information or comparisons. *Important Note: Incorporate the following specifics (1. Culture, 2. Title (Must be Italicized) 3. Date, 4. Period, 5. Medium, 6. Dimension, 7. Condition) about each work into the body of your text in sentence form. Directions *Take this sheet on your museum visit. Use these questions in any order when looking at the object(s) you have chosen for your museum response paper assignment. Not all of them may be pertinent to your object. You may choose the ones that will best fit the thesis of your paper. If you’re able to write a few sentences under each question while you’re at the museum, you’ll have the beginnings of your essay ready to work on at home. REMEMBER: you are being graded on the quality of your close looking, on what you can SEE at the museum, and how you contextualize your object(s) though YOUR OWN observations. THIS IS NOT A RESEARCH PAPER. 1) Your museum experience •Start taking notes from the moment you begin to see the museum as you walk up to it from the street. How does the museum building relate to its surroundings? Is it similar, different, larger, smaller than the urban fabric around it? •What is the exterior interior like? Is it decorated? Can you tell what style of architecture it is? How does it relate to what you see inside? •What is the entrance lobby to the museum like? How does it shape the beginning of your museum visit? •Who is attending the museum? What is the general atmosphere like? •How are the galleries organized? Why do you think the galleries and exhibitions look the way they do? (Think about wall color, lighting, interior arrangement etc). •How is your object displayed? What other objects is they near to, and why? After exploring the galleries, stand in front of your chosen object and ask yourself the following questions. Make detailed notes. 2) First Impressions •What do you see? This is an important question to ask yourself before you read the object label. Your first impressions might change once you have read about the work, and the connections or changes you make between your initial impressions and later conclusions can form an interesting part of your paper. 3) Form •Note textures and the quality of the surface of the work. What adjectives could you use throughout your analysis? Eg. shiny, dull, had, soft, rough, smooth. •How does the artist use line, color, light and shadow? (See chapter 3 The Visual Elements of your textbook for explanations of these terms, “Formal Analysis”) •What about the composition? Is it balanced, symmetrical, asymmetrical? Why? •How big is the work? How does size affect your reaction to the work? How does size affect the depiction of the subject? 4) Context •Read the label – what can we tell from the label? Look for the artist’s name, the media/materials used in creating the work, and when and where the piece was made. •Where was the work originally meant to have been seen, and how might the current context in the museum be similar or different? What might it have been like to view the work in its original context? •Where is the viewer meant to stand in relation to the work? Is there one viewpoint or multiple viewing points? •Identify the subject matter. Be certain to describe all of the components depicted. Is this artwork telling a story? Is it religious or mythological? 5) In-Depth •Is the subject ideal or real? Describe the style. Is this a realistic depiction? Is it abstract? Is the style of this work similar to styles we have studied? •You have identified the material(s) used from the object label. Why might the artist have used this material? •What do you think the artist or the patron of the work was trying to say about his or her subject? •Where is this work located? What other works are near it to the right and to the left (brief details/comparisons, not a full analysis). Does it relate to its surroundings at all? •Look around the gallery. Are there other wall texts or information points that might help you think about your object further? Look for leaflets, plaques on the wall to find out who sponsored the gallery, museum guards, docents etc. 6) Personal Response •Describe why you selected this work. What do you like/dislike about it? •Is this work popular? Do other people stop and look at it? What are some of the reactions you overhear? NOTE: Make sure that you are able to articulate the difference between mere description unconnected to any developing ideas in your essay (bad) and formal analysis that connects and deepens as your essay progresses (good). You must use CLAIM + EVIDENCE •Eg. “This work is very beautiful. The sculpture has two arms, two legs and is covered by a long garment.” NO. This is a “claim” or a “statement” – you need to develop ideas like these to show your reader why you might have come to such conclusions, or why your observations matter in the greater context of your paper. •Eg. “The sculpture is wearing a long garment that emphasizes the proportion and length of her body. In keeping with Hellenistic tradition, the effect makes the figure seem life-like, as if the clothing might move if touched it as if the sculpture could walk. This is contradicted by the fact that the work is actually made from very hard and immoveable white marble.” YES. Sentences 2 and 3 develop the description of the figure in Sentence 1, contextualizing the observations made in the museum with information learned in class lectures and from the object label.

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Museum observation paper

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

GET A 40% DISCOUNT ON YOU FIRST ORDER

ORDER NOW DISCOUNT CODE >>>> WELCOME40

technically due at 11:59pm please!!
I added the prompt on the bottom. It’s a paper on observations of going to the Rosecrucian musuem in san jose, ca. I went but had no time to write this report due to family illness and would appreciate your help so much!
The four works i chose that were in the musuem were the:
1. The coffin of king tutankhamun
2. The rosetta stone
3. The bust of nefertiti
4. Law code of hammurabi
You could look up these objects at the rosicrucian museum so you could describe them better!FIELD STUDY REPORT: Ancient to Gothic Survey I All students are strongly urged to attend this exceptional opportunity as viewing original works of art is of primary concern. You will visit a Museum, enjoy yourself and write a 1200 to 1400 word report (1300 words required for consideration of an ‘A’ grade. It is suggested that you first write at least 1500 words and edit the material down to the required length, rather than working from the perspective of only filling the required space. (using 12 point Times New Roman font, double-spaced) Please include a cover sheet. This is not a research paper! I am interested in what you see and how it relates directly to the specific period of our studies. After selecting the works, develop a thesis topic that brings them together. The thesis can be as simple as comparing the formal characteristics of the works to each other or to works we have discussed in class. APPROACH TO THE REPORT: Select FOUR or FIVE works (paintings, sculptures, drawing, prints or architectural models) from at least two different periods that you feel are good representations of styles or artists that we have or will discuss in this class. No library research is required for this assignment, but you are encouraged to consult your textbooks for basic information or comparisons. *Important Note: Incorporate the following specifics (1. Culture, 2. Title (Must be Italicized) 3. Date, 4. Period, 5. Medium, 6. Dimension, 7. Condition) about each work into the body of your text in sentence form. Directions *Take this sheet on your museum visit. Use these questions in any order when looking at the object(s) you have chosen for your museum response paper assignment. Not all of them may be pertinent to your object. You may choose the ones that will best fit the thesis of your paper. If you’re able to write a few sentences under each question while you’re at the museum, you’ll have the beginnings of your essay ready to work on at home. REMEMBER: you are being graded on the quality of your close looking, on what you can SEE at the museum, and how you contextualize your object(s) though YOUR OWN observations. THIS IS NOT A RESEARCH PAPER. 1) Your museum experience •Start taking notes from the moment you begin to see the museum as you walk up to it from the street. How does the museum building relate to its surroundings? Is it similar, different, larger, smaller than the urban fabric around it? •What is the exterior interior like? Is it decorated? Can you tell what style of architecture it is? How does it relate to what you see inside? •What is the entrance lobby to the museum like? How does it shape the beginning of your museum visit? •Who is attending the museum? What is the general atmosphere like? •How are the galleries organized? Why do you think the galleries and exhibitions look the way they do? (Think about wall color, lighting, interior arrangement etc). •How is your object displayed? What other objects is they near to, and why? After exploring the galleries, stand in front of your chosen object and ask yourself the following questions. Make detailed notes. 2) First Impressions •What do you see? This is an important question to ask yourself before you read the object label. Your first impressions might change once you have read about the work, and the connections or changes you make between your initial impressions and later conclusions can form an interesting part of your paper. 3) Form •Note textures and the quality of the surface of the work. What adjectives could you use throughout your analysis? Eg. shiny, dull, had, soft, rough, smooth. •How does the artist use line, color, light and shadow? (See chapter 3 The Visual Elements of your textbook for explanations of these terms, “Formal Analysis”) •What about the composition? Is it balanced, symmetrical, asymmetrical? Why? •How big is the work? How does size affect your reaction to the work? How does size affect the depiction of the subject? 4) Context •Read the label – what can we tell from the label? Look for the artist’s name, the media/materials used in creating the work, and when and where the piece was made. •Where was the work originally meant to have been seen, and how might the current context in the museum be similar or different? What might it have been like to view the work in its original context? •Where is the viewer meant to stand in relation to the work? Is there one viewpoint or multiple viewing points? •Identify the subject matter. Be certain to describe all of the components depicted. Is this artwork telling a story? Is it religious or mythological? 5) In-Depth •Is the subject ideal or real? Describe the style. Is this a realistic depiction? Is it abstract? Is the style of this work similar to styles we have studied? •You have identified the material(s) used from the object label. Why might the artist have used this material? •What do you think the artist or the patron of the work was trying to say about his or her subject? •Where is this work located? What other works are near it to the right and to the left (brief details/comparisons, not a full analysis). Does it relate to its surroundings at all? •Look around the gallery. Are there other wall texts or information points that might help you think about your object further? Look for leaflets, plaques on the wall to find out who sponsored the gallery, museum guards, docents etc. 6) Personal Response •Describe why you selected this work. What do you like/dislike about it? •Is this work popular? Do other people stop and look at it? What are some of the reactions you overhear? NOTE: Make sure that you are able to articulate the difference between mere description unconnected to any developing ideas in your essay (bad) and formal analysis that connects and deepens as your essay progresses (good). You must use CLAIM + EVIDENCE •Eg. “This work is very beautiful. The sculpture has two arms, two legs and is covered by a long garment.” NO. This is a “claim” or a “statement” – you need to develop ideas like these to show your reader why you might have come to such conclusions, or why your observations matter in the greater context of your paper. •Eg. “The sculpture is wearing a long garment that emphasizes the proportion and length of her body. In keeping with Hellenistic tradition, the effect makes the figure seem life-like, as if the clothing might move if touched it as if the sculpture could walk. This is contradicted by the fact that the work is actually made from very hard and immoveable white marble.” YES. Sentences 2 and 3 develop the description of the figure in Sentence 1, contextualizing the observations made in the museum with information learned in class lectures and from the object label.

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

GET A 40% DISCOUNT ON YOU FIRST ORDER

ORDER NOW DISCOUNT CODE >>>> WELCOME40

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized