Political Science 1102-001, Summer 2018 Research Paper & Turnitin.com Instructions

aPolitical Science 1102-001, Summer 2018
Research Paper & Turnitin.com Instructions
Research paper (value 30%): You’re required to write a double-spaced, 12-point font, 2000-word research paper on one of the research questions (see the separate document ‘research paper questions’ posted on Blackboard). You’re required to reference your course text book and at least 4 academic sources and 1 popular source using the American Political Science Association in-text author-date parentheses citation/referencing style (also referred to as the Chicago Manual of Style Author-Date System). See the following site: http://guides.douglascollege.ca/c.php?g=243172&p=1617491
You’ll follow the political science argumentative paper format which has three main components: (1) an introduction with a thesis statement (your answer to the research paper question) and at least three supporting points, (2) a body where you support your thesis by developing your supporting points and addressing any counter points, and (3) a conclusion.
The hard copy of your paper is due at the beginning of class on the 24 July. You’re required to submit your paper to turnitin.com.
Turnitin.com instructions: Logon to your Turnitin.com account (you already set one up for Assignment 1). Go to the course ‘Introduction to Canadian Government 1102-001 Summer 2018’ and then to the assignment ‘Research Paper’. From there follow the instructions to upload your paper.
Failure to submit a hard copy of your research paper and submit it to Turnitin.com results in an UN grade. Late research papers are penalized 5 percent a day, including weekends.
Research Paper Instructions:
Minimum/maximum length: 2,000 words, excluding the title page and reference page/bibliography page. Your paper must be double-spaced and 12-point font. You must have a separate title page and a separate reference page (bibliography). You must include the exact word count on your title page, excluding your title page and reference (see the ‘title page for research paper – example’ on Blackboard);
Page numbering and stapling: You must include page numbers on the bottom right hand corner. Do not number your title page. You must also staple your paper in the top left-hand corner. Do not insert your essay into any sort of cover (e.g., plastic cover, binder, or duo tang);
Citation and referencing: You must consistently and properly cite and reference all sources using the American Political Science Association in-text author-date parentheses citation/referencing style (also referred to as the Chicago Manual of Style Author-Date System). See the following site: http://guides.douglascollege.ca/c.php?g=243172&p=1617491
Example of direct quotes, indirect quotes (paraphrased material), and information not widely known must be cited: Note: you MUST include page number(s) when you cite. An example of a direct quote is: “Given this literature there are several reasons for a fresh look at the recruitment process” (Norris and Lovenduski 1995, 7). An indirect quote, where you paraphrase a source by putting it in your own words, should look like this: the need to update the recruitment literature has been well established (Norris and Lovenduski 1995, 7). Failure to include the author (s), year, and page number(s) will result in a failing mark. NO exceptions. Where there is no page number, for example, on a website, use this example: (Norris and Lovenduski 2017, np).
Minimum sources: You must frequently cite a minimum of four academic (scholarly) sources (JSTOR is a good place to start). In addition, you must also cite your course text book (the textbook does not count as one of your four academic sources). Your separate reference page must include all sources you cite using the above the American Political Science Association in-text author-date parentheses citation/referencing style (also referred to as the Chicago Manual of Style Author-Date System). Again, see the following site: http://guides.douglascollege.ca/c.php?g=243172&p=1617491
Do not include sources on your reference page that you do not actually read and/or cite in your paper. Encarta, Wikipedia and other online encyclopedias do not count as academic sources. Please feel free to use online sources such as newspapers, websites, Elections Canada and Elections BC and government/party/MP websites, but keep in mind they do not count as academic sources. If you are not sure whether a source is academic, ask me;
Define key terms: You must define all key political science related terms using the course textbook. Do not use Wikipedia, Maple Leaf, or other online encyclopedic or suspect sources for definitions. Ask me if you have questions;
Use gender neutral language/ pronouns: For example, use ‘they’ instead of he or she;
Organization: Research papers must present: 1) a clear thesis statement (your answer to the main question), 2) at least three main supporting points, and some counter points if applicable, 3) a logical organizational structure, 4) a diverse range of supporting evidence, 5) analysis linking the evidence and the thesis, and 6) a relevant introduction and conclusion;
Writing standard: Research papers must be well written (e.g., complete sentences, appropriate use of paragraphs, proper grammar, and correct spelling), and;
Academic Honesty: All work submitted must be original. You are bound to Douglas College’s Code of Academic Integrity and its procedures for addressing academic dishonesty and misconduct https://www.douglascollege.ca/~/media/27C599ABC76048A0A713648565906273.ashx
**NOTE: If you fail to meet any of these minimum requirements you will receive a low or failing grade on your research essay. No exceptions.**
Research and paper writing tips: The following websites provide tips for organizing, researching, and writing political science papers.
For research and essay writing:
Douglas College Library’s Political Science Guide: http://guides.douglascollege.ca/politicalscience-sg
Academic sources may be found through data base searches e.g., JSTOR http://library.douglascollege.ca/articles-databases/popular-databases/jstor
SFU’s library research guide for political science:
http://www.lib.sfu.ca/help/subject-guides/political-science/home
Academic versus non-academic sources: what is the difference?
Your sources must be peer reviewed and qualify as academic or scholarly. Douglas College provides a chart of scholarly journals and information on how to tell whether a source is peer reviewed. Cornell University provides additional information on how to distinguish between academic (scholarly) and non-academic sources: http://www.library.cornell.edu/olinuris/ref/research/skill20.html
Help?
Douglas College provides writing help at the Learning Centre: http://guides.douglascollege.ca/thelearningcentre/home
You are also encouraged to drop by the library for additional paper writing help.
Sources of information:
Journals you may find useful for this and other political science courses include:
American Political Science Review
The British Journal of Political Science
Canadian Journal of Political Science
Canadian Public Policy
Journal of Conflict Resolution Journal of International Affairs
Policy Options
Political Science Quarterly
Review of Politics
The American Journal of Political Science
Websites you may find useful for this course:
Please see the course text’s margins.

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