Read the story – https://wikis.westchesterlibraries.org/occfiles/The_Birthmark.p

Read the story – https://wikis.westchesterlibraries.org/occfiles/The_Birthmark.p

Read the story – https://wikis.westchesterlibraries.org/occfiles/The_Birthmark.pdf All parts of assignments below should use APA 7th edition. Both of the multimodal elements require the use of narration. Part One Focus on the Process Step One: Pick a piece of fiction that the class read throughout the semester. Create five specific research questions that could be used to write a research-based literary analysis on that piece of fiction. Step Two: Pick one of the research questions and turn it into a thesis statement that would be used in a research-based literary analysis. Step Three: Based on that thesis and the argument you would make in the paper, create an annotated bibliography that reviews five library database sources that you would use to support the argument. These sources should only come from library databases like J-Stor, ProQuest, and PubMed. Ten points will be deducted from the assignment for each non-database source that is included. Each annotation should be 150 words and include a summary of the source, an assessment of the credibility of the author, and a consideration of how the source would help you support your paper’s augment. https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/common_writing_assignments/annotated_bibliographies/annotated_bibliography_samples.html Step Four: Create an outline for the assignment based on the thesis that you created. This should be a full sentence outline that includes citations based on MLA or APA, whichever form of formatting your course is using. https://libguides.umgc.edu/annotated-bibliography-apa https://lynn-library.libguides.com/apa/bib https://guides.library.cornell.edu/annotatedbibliography https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQK_Y0rCnvA Step Five: Submit a title and opening paragraph for the paper that you would write based on your thesis, and take your sources from the annotated bibliography and present them in a properly formatted Works Cited or References page (based on the form of formatting that your class uses). Part Two Multimodal Element for Focus on the Process The ideas, wording, and sources in this section must be original and should not be repeated from the essay. In an originally written and narrated PowerPoint (meaning, none of the wording or sources should come from your essay), that combines words and images, develop a mini conference presentation for an audience of academics and scholars who may teach the piece of fiction that you discussed in part one and argue for why the fiction is still relevant to study in the modern world. In a no less than 2-minute PowerPoint, include a title slide, a slide with a full introduction, the hook and thesis, and slides that use your voice, the written word, and visuals to address your argument about why your play is one that still connects with those who exist in the word today. Use, at least, two new scholarly sources in this section not used in part one to support your argument (books or journal articles obtained from library databases like J-Stor, ProQuest, or PubMed). All of the sources used must be cited on the slides and on an ending Works Cited or References slide, depending upon the form of formatting that your class uses. Cite as you would if you were citing within an essay. The PowerPoint should have five body slides, so that’s eight slides overall (title slide, introductory slide, five body slides, and a Works Cited slide) Thesis My story of X, written by Author Y, is still relevant to study in the modern world for this reason and this reason. The textual evidence from the fiction and the required sources should be used in the body of the work and not in the introduction or conclusion of the document. Title Slide Introductory Slide (hook and thesis) One reason why my story still connects with those in the modern world – include relevant and appropriate scholarly source to help support your argument) Still arguing for that one reason why my story still connects with those in the modern world – include relevant and appropriate scholarly source to help support your argument) Second reason why my story still connects with those in the modern world – include relevant and appropriate scholarly source to help support your argument) Still arguing for that second reason why my story still connects with those in the modern world – include relevant and appropriate scholarly source to help support your argument) Conclusion Works Cited Part One Writing a Cover Letter for a Literary Figure I teach a course that teaches other people how to teach first-year composition courses, and one of the students shared an interesting assignment that she does with her classes. It’s a literary analysis – with a twist. You would still need to format your work using MLA or APA, still need to cite, still need to use and analyze textual evidence from the fiction, still need to meet the page count, etc., but some of you may be more familiar with this style of writing than with a traditional literary analysis. So, what you would do is write a cover letter for a figure from a piece of literature – remember, the author is not a character in his or her own piece of fiction, and this is for a literature course, so refrain from using bullet points rather than fully-developed paragraphs. You would still need an introduction with a thesis – I, William Wilson, from Edgar Allen Poe’s short story of the same name, “William Wilson,” would make an ideal addition to the Federal Bureau of Investigation because I have the attributes of blank and blank. This job makes sense for a character like this one, and I can use the text to prove that he would, indeed, be a good addition to the FBI. Find an actual job listing from a site like Indeed and write the letter for that real position. Include the job listing after your Works Cited or References page, depending upon the form of formatting that your class uses. You would still need well-organized body paragraphs that have a topic sentence, claim, and evidence/analysis of textual evidence from the fiction. You would still need a conclusion, and you would still need a Works Cited or References page and in-text citations. You must include two database “references,” so that would be two scholarly sources (books or journal articles obtained from library databases like J-Stor, ProQuest, or PubMed) whose thoughts on the figure support him or her applying for and potentially getting the job. In other words, treat these like references vouching for the two attributes the figure is claiming the person possesses. This will not be a traditional cover letter in so much as you will need to use and analyze textual evidence from the fiction, but it will have the spirit of a cover letter in so much as you will be selling someone for a job. This is an actual cover letter: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/job_search_writing/job_search_letters/academic_cover_letters/academic_cover_letter_sample.html. You would need to adapt this to meet the criteria above, but as you can see, it allows for direct address of an audience, and you are still selling something: you are selling a literary figure to a potential employer while showing that you understand the major attributes of a literary analysis. Here are some resources you can use to guide you. You are not filling in a resume, but you would be constructing the letter that would go along with the resume: https://www.quia.com/files/quia/users/egrahamj1/Character-Resume- http://www.mrsoshouse.com/puzpro/resumelit.html The letter should be two double-spaced pages of writing and use Times New Roman and 12. The sources should be used in the body of the work and not in the introduction or full references area of the document. MLA Headers Title Introduction (hook and thesis) Body paragraph one (with textual evidence from the fiction and a source cited and meaningfully used to support the paragraph’s claims) Body paragraph two (with textual evidence from the fiction and a source cited and meaningfully used to support the paragraph’s claims) Conclusion Works Cited Databases Used Blank Blank Blank Part Two Multimodal Element for Writing a Cover Letter for a Literary Figure The ideas, wording, and sources in this section must be original and should not be repeated from the essay. Produce a two-minute video resume, using a narrated PowerPoint or Loom or Screencastify, for your literary figure, discussing, based on the fiction, what attributes the person has that would make the person a good employee. You must include two new database “references,” so that would be two new scholarly sources (books or journal articles obtained from library databases like J-Stor, ProQuest, or PubMed) that function as references for the resume portion of the work, sources you did not use in part one. Thesis My name is Blank, and I appear in Fiction Y, written by Author X, and I would make an excellent addition to any workplace because of this reason and this reason. The textual evidence from the fiction and the required sources should be used in the body of the work and not in the introduction or conclusion of the document. Title Slide Introductory Slide (hook and thesis) Slide one arguing for the major attributes that would make the figure a good employee Slide two arguing for the major attributes that would make the figure a good employee Slide three arguing for the major attributes that would make the figure a good employee Slide four arguing for the major attributes that would make the figure a good employee Conclusion Works Cited Databases Used Blank Blank Blank

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