Recall this week's presentation. Does a person in need of an organ transplant have a moral right to obtain that transplant, supposing the availability of the needed organ?

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Recall this week’s presentation. Does a person in need of an organ transplant have a moral right to obtain that transplant, supposing the availability of the needed organ?
How should we choose who gets a transplant, supposing that there are not enough organs for all who need them?
please include intext citations if possible and please include references.
Remember to reply to at least two of your classmates.
post 1:
The ethical discussion of organ transplantation has been recognized as one of the most afflicting medical advances of the century as it provides a way of giving the gift of life to patients with terminal organ failure, which requires the participation of other human beings and of society by donating organs from deceased or living participants. Every 10 minutes, someone is added to the national transplant waiting list (UNOS, 2018). The increasing incidence of vital organ failure and the inadequate supply of organs has caused a wide gap between organ supply and organ demand. On average, 20 people die each day while waiting for a transplant (UNOS, 2018). These statistics have raised many ethical, moral, and societal issues regarding supply and the methods of organ assignment. I believe all participants on an organ transplant list have the right to transplant no matter their reason for needing one. There was a man in Canada who was a long-term alcoholic in need of a liver transplant. He died in 2010, two weeks after being diagnosed with acute alcoholic hepatitis. The doctors said he would die without a transplant, but he had to abstain from alcohol for six months before being eligible for surgery. I do agree with this policy because alcoholism can make someone less likely to follow through with the doctor’s orders and can damage the new liver. I also believe smokers should quit smoking before receiving a lung transplant because they can also damage their new organ if they don’t follow lifestyle modifications appropriately.
Abouna, G. M. (2003). Ethical issues in organ transplantation. Medical Principle Practice,54-69. Retrieved July 16, 2018.
UNOS. (2018). Retrieved July 16, 2018, from https://unos.org/
post 2:
he primary ethical dilemmas surrounding organ transplantation have their origin on the shortage of available organs. Not everyone who needs an organ transplant, or is morally entitled, gets one. There are three principles of primary importance in the allocation of human organs. The first one is utility, the second principle is justice, and the third one is respect for people. Utility refers to the maximization of net benefit to the community and justice refers to the fair pattern of distribution of benefits. All members of the public are morally entitled to fair access. For this reason, allocation programs routinely consider medical need as well as medical benefits, prioritizing the medically sickest patients even if it is predictable that other patients who are not as sick will have better outcomes (Health Resources and Services Administration, 2015). Furthermore, I believe organs should be distributed using the maximum benefit criteria in order to maximize the number of successful transplants. These criteria includes the medical need (i.e., the sickest patients are given the first opportunity for a transplantable organ), and probable success of a transplant (i.e., giving organs to the patient who will be most likely to live the longest). The total period time that the patient has been on the waiting list is one more factor that requires consideration (Center for Bioethics, 2004).
References
Center for Bioethics. (2004, February). Ethics of Organ Transplantation. Retrieved July 16, 2018, from https://www.ahc.umn.edu/img/assets/26104/Organ_Transplantation.pdf
Health Resources and Services Administration. (2015, June). Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network. Retrieved July 16, 2018, from https://optn.transplant.hrsa.gov/resources/ethics/ethical-principles-in-the-allocation-of-human-organs/

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