Right to own guns (Gun control)

To persuade the audience that there should be more restrictions  to access guns
( But I do agree certain people should have access to guns)
(ex. Further evaluations to whom can own a gun)

Preparation Outline Guide (10 Points)

The following is a guide to use as you develop preparation outlines for your speeches. For purposes of illustration, this guide has three main points in the body of the speech. In your speeches, of course, the number and organization of main points, subpoints, and sub-subpoints will vary depending on the topic and purpose of any given speech. However, the elements needed in the outline—title, specific purpose statement, central idea, introduction, body, conclusion, connectives, bibliography—will remain the same. DON’T CHANGE THE FORMATTING, THIS WILL AFFECT YOUR GRADE. YOU CAN DELETE ALL THE INSTRUCTIONS BUT MAKE SURE AND KEEP ALL THE MAJOR SECTIONS OF THE OUTLINE, AND INSERT YOUR TOPIC’S CONTENT.
Name:
Date:
Section:
TITLE
General Purpose: Broad goal of speech: To inform
Specific Purpose Statement:  [ What you want the audience to know. Use the phrase: “By the end of the speech my audience will…know,understand….”]
Central Idea:  [ A 1-3 sentence summary of what you actually say in your speech. However you phrase it, the statement should directly reflect the language of the main points, naming them specifically in a way that illuminates the major ideas of the speech.]
Type of Informative Speech: (Descriptive, Explanatory, Definitional, Demonstrative)
Method of Organization: (Topical, Chronological, Spatial, Causal, Comparison)
INTRODUCTION
(1) Attention Getter:
(2) Reveal the topic of the speech
(3) Establish credibility and goodwill
(4) Preview the body of the speech (Actually mention your main points)
Transitional statement:  (A phrase that will get you from Intro to Body of speech)
BODY

  1. A single complete sentence expressing the main point of this section of the speech. No fragments
    1. Subpoint [As with main points, subpoints should be written in full sentences.]
      1. Sub-subpoint [Incorporate evidence to support broader points.]
      2. Sub-subpoint
    2. Subpoint

(Connective:  Use a transition or other connective to help the audience move with you from one main point to the next.)

  1. A single complete sentence expressing the main point of this section of the speech.
    1. Subpoint
    2. Subpoint
      1. Sub-subpoint
        1. Sub-sub-subpoint
        2. Sub-sub-subpoint
      2. Sub-subpoint

(Connective:  Use a transition or other connective to help the audience move with you from one main point to the next.)

  • A single complete sentence expressing the main point of this section of the speech.
    1. Subpoint
      1. Sub-subpoint
      2. Sub-subpoint
    2. Subpoint
      1. Sub-subpoint
      2. Sub-subpoint
      3. Sub-subpoint
    3. Subpoint

(Connective: Use a transition or other connective to help the audience move with you from the body of your speech to the conclusion.)
CONCLUSION
(1) Let the audience know you are ending the speech
(2) Reinforce the audience’s understanding of, or commitment to, the central idea.
(3) Wow statement
BIBLIOGRAPHY
[Here you list complete citations for the research materials using MLA format: see Hostos Library webpage for assistance or use www.easybib.com]
 

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