Selection of topics in the additional uploaded materials

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Essay of 2500 words on one of the topics in the assignment brief
6HURM009W COMPARATIVE INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT
 
ESSAY GUIDELINES 2017-18.2
 
 
The coursework is intended to give students an opportunity to critically analyse issues in comparative international management and to compare phenomena across countries.
 
 
 
The coursework consists of a 2500-word essay (+/- 10%)
researched, written, and submitted individually.
 
The essay represents 50% of the module’s final mark.
 
Coursework must be submitted electronically via BlackBoard
before 12 April 2018 at 12:59 PM
 
You are strongly advised to submit your work as far ahead of the deadline as possible and you should aim to submit your work at least one day ahead of the deadline to allow for unexpected delays.
 
 
 

  1. What are you required to do?

 
 

  • Select one topic from the next section. Chose the topic you are more interested in and/or you feel more comfortable with.
  • Make sure you read and understand all essential reading for your topic. The essential reading includes: the module’s core textbook and all other essential material of your topic’s unit.
  • You are encouraged to use other resources but check what the essential reading has to offer before starting your own research.
  • In your essay you must show evidence that you have understood what you have read. You must, in other words, set out information clearly and accurately throughout your essay.
  • In order to get a better grade you must try and move away from description to analysis and synthesis.
  • A high quality of presentation is assumed in Level 6 work. The quality of your presentation will affect your ability to communicate your ideas to the reader, and this will affect the reader’s judgement on some or all of the assessment criteria.
  • For further information on essay writing (content, format, etc), and assessment criteria please refer to sections 3 and 4 of this document.
  • Ask for help if you are feeling lost. Approach the module leader or seminar teacher for guidance as early as possible. Better safe than sorry.

 

  1. Essay Titles

 
 
Unit 1: Firms, Institutions, and Varieties of Capitalism
 
TOPIC 1: ‘Corporations have caused more harm than good and there is little that society can do to stop them’. Discuss.
 
Essential reading includes, but it is not limited to:
 
Can We Do It Ourselves? (Sweden, 2015) http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/can-we-do-it-ourselves/
 
Chang, H-O (2009) 23 Things they don’t tell you about capitalism. London: Penguin.
 
Koen, C. I. (2005) Comparative International Management, London: McGraw-Hill.
 
Plesch, D. and Blakenburg, S. (2008) How to Make Corporations Accountable, Liverpool: The Institute of Employment Rights. OR Plesch, D. and Blakenburg, S. (2007) Corporate Rights and Responsibilities: Restoring Legal Accountability, London: RSA.
 
Sorge, A., Noorderhaven, N., and Koen, C. (2015) Comparative International Management. Second Edition. Abingdon: Routledge.
 
The Corporation (Canada, 2005)
 
 
TOPIC 2: Compare and contrast the property and community views of the firm. Which model is better? Why?
 
Essential reading includes, but it is not limited to:
 
Albert, M. (1993) Capitalism vs. Capitalism, New York: Four Wall Eight Windows. Chapter 6: The Other Capitalism, pp. 99-126 & Chapter 7: The Economic Superiority of the Rhine Model, pp. 127-146.
 
Chang, H-O (2009) 23 Things they don’t tell you about capitalism. London: Penguin.
 
Dore, R. (2006) Stock Market Capitalism, Welfare Capitalism. Japan and Germany versus the Anglo-Saxons, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Chapter 2: A Society of Long-Term Commitments (pp. 23-48), Chapter 9: The Co-determined Firm (pp. 182-206), & Chapter 10: The Organised Community (pp. 207-215).
 
Koen, C. I. (2005) Comparative International Management, London: McGraw-Hill.
 
Sorge, A., Noorderhaven, N., and Koen, C. (2015) Comparative International Management. Second Edition. Abingdon: Routledge.
 
 
Unit 2: Comparative Corporate Governance
 
Topic 3: Does the downfall of Enron illustrate the strengths or the weaknesses of the shareholder model of corporate governance? Discuss.
 
Essential reading includes, but it is not limited to:
 
Chang, H-O (2009) 23 Things they don’t tell you about capitalism. London: Penguin.
 
Dore, R. (2006) Stock Market Capitalism, Welfare Capitalism. Japan and Germany versus the Anglo-Saxons, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Chapter 4: Corporate Governance: From the employee-favouring firm to the shareholder-favouring firm (pp. 71-132).
 
Deakin, S. and Konzelmann, S. J. (2003) After ENRON: An Age of Enlightenment?, Organization, Vol. 10, Issue 3, pp. 583-587.
 
Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room (2005)
 
Koen, C. I. (2005) Comparative International Management, London: McGraw-Hill. Chapter 6: Comparative Corporate Governance
 
Lazonick, W. and O’Sullivan, M. (2000) ‘Maximizing shareholder value: a new ideology for corporate governance’. Economy and Society, 29, 13-35.
 
Page, (2012) Co-determination in Germany: A Beginners Guide.
 
Sorge, A., Noorderhaven, N., and Koen, C. (2015) Comparative International Management. Second Edition. Abingdon: Routledge. Chapter 6: Comparative Corporate Governance
 
 
Topic 4: ‘Thanks to its co-determination institutions, the stakeholder model of corporate governance is more effective at preventing corporate scandals such as Enron’s’. Discuss.
 
Essential reading includes, but it is not limited to:
 
Chang, H-O (2009) 23 Things they don’t tell you about capitalism. London: Penguin.
 
Dore, R. (2006) Stock Market Capitalism, Welfare Capitalism. Japan and Germany versus the Anglo-Saxons, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Chapter 4: Corporate Governance: From the employee-favouring firm to the shareholder-favouring firm (pp. 71-132).
 
Deakin, S. and Konzelmann, S. J. (2003) After ENRON: An Age of Enlightenment?, Organization, Vol. 10, Issue 3, pp. 583-587.
 
Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room (2005)
 
Koen, C. I. (2005) Comparative International Management, London: McGraw-Hill. Chapter 6: Comparative Corporate Governance
 
Lazonick, W. and O’Sullivan, M. (2000) ‘Maximizing shareholder value: a new ideology for corporate governance’. Economy and Society, 29, 13-35.
 
Page, (2012) Co-determination in Germany: A Beginners Guide.
 
Sorge, A., Noorderhaven, N., and Koen, C. (2015) Comparative International Management. Second Edition. Abingdon: Routledge. Chapter 6: Comparative Corporate Governance
 
 
Topic 5: ‘Shareholder value is the dumbest idea in the world’ (Welch, 2009). Discuss.
 
Essential reading includes, but it is not limited to:
 
Chang, H-O (2009) 23 Things they don’t tell you about capitalism. London: Penguin.
 
Dore, R. (2006) Stock Market Capitalism, Welfare Capitalism. Japan and Germany versus the Anglo-Saxons, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Chapter 4: Corporate Governance: From the employee-favouring firm to the shareholder-favouring firm (pp. 71-132).
 
Deakin, S. and Konzelmann, S. J. (2003) After ENRON: An Age of Enlightenment?, Organization, Vol. 10, Issue 3, pp. 583-587.
 
Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room (2005)
 
Koen, C. I. (2005) Comparative International Management, London: McGraw-Hill. Chapter 6: Comparative Corporate Governance
 
Lazonick, W. and O’Sullivan, M. (2000) ‘Maximizing shareholder value: a new ideology for corporate governance’. Economy and Society, 29, 13-35.
 
Page, (2012) Co-determination in Germany: A Beginners Guide.
 
Sorge, A., Noorderhaven, N., and Koen, C. (2015) Comparative International Management. Second Edition. Abingdon: Routledge. Chapter 6: Comparative Corporate Governance
 
 
 
Unit 3: Comparative Employment Relations
 
 
TOPIC 6: ‘Trade unions may be good for some workers but, overall, detrimental to the economy. Therefore, union busting is a totally legitimate activity’. Discuss.
 
Essential reading includes, but it is not limited to:
 
Budd, J. W. (2004a) Achieving Decent Work by Giving Employment and Human Face. Geneva: ILO.
 
Budd, J. W. (2004b) Labour Relations: Striking a Balance. NY: McGraw-Hill. Chapter 2: Labour Unions: Good or Bad?
 
Bread and Roses (UK, 2000)
 
Global Competitiveness Report.
 
Hyman, R. (2001) Between Class, Market and Society. ‘Introduction’. London: Sage.
 
Koen, C. I. (2005) Comparative International Management, London: McGraw-Hill. Chapter 12: Globalisation.
 
Levitt, M. J. (1993) Confessions of a Union Buster, New York: Crown Publishers. Foreword, Prologue (1-5), Chapter ‘Poison’ (pp. 239-259); Epilogue (287-290).
 
Logan, J. (2004) The Fine Art of Union Busting, New Labor Forum, Vol. 13, No. 2, pp. 77-91.
 
Data on trade union member and density. OECD; Eurofound; and Worker Participation EU.
 
Sorge, A., Noorderhaven, N., and Koen, C. (2015) Comparative International Management. Second Edition. Abingdon: Routledge. Chapter 11: Globalisation
 
 


TOPIC 7: ‘Achieving a balance between equity, efficiency and voice in the employment relationship is undesirable and unrealistic’. Discuss.
 
Essential reading includes, but it is not limited to:
 
Budd, J. W. (2004a) Achieving Decent Work by Giving Employment and Human Face. Geneva: ILO.
 
Budd, J. W. (2004b) Labour Relations: Striking a Balance. NY: McGraw-Hill. Chapter 2: Labour Unions: Good or Bad?
 
Gordon, D. M. 1996) Fat and Mean: The Corporate Squeeze of Working Americans and the Myth of Managerial Downsizing, New York: Free Press. Introduction; Chapter 3: The Stick Strategy (pp. 61-94), and Chapter 6: We Take the Low Road (pp. 144-171).
 
Human Rights Watch (2000) Unfair Advantage: Workers’ Freedom of Association in the United States under International Human Rights Standards.
http://www.hrw.org/en/reports/2000/08/01/unfair-advantage-workers-freedom-association-united-states-under-international-hu
 
Logan, J. (2004) The Fine Art of Union Busting, New Labor Forum, Vol. 13, No. 2, pp. 77-91.
 
Prasch (1998) Corporate Strategy and the American Standard of Living: Reviewing Gordon’s Fat and Mean. Review of Political Economy, 10:1.
 
Readings by Hyman, Budd, Estreicher and Bamber in: Symposium on John W. Budd: Employment with a HumanFace: Four Views on Efficiency, Equity, and Voice in the World of Work. Employee Responsibilities and Rights Journal, Vol. 17, No. 2, June 2005.
 
Wilkinson, R. And Pickett, K. (2009) The Spirit Level: Why Equality is Better for Everyone. London: Penguin.
 
 
 
Unit 4: Varieties of Capitalism: Convergence, Divergence, and Socio-economic Outcomes
 
TOPIC 8: ‘Enron was the pit canary, but its death went unheeded’ (McLean, 2008). To what extent the collapse of ENRON can help us understand the Financial Crisis of 2008?
 
Essential reading includes, but it is not limited to:
 
Chang, Ha-Joon (2010) 23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism. Conclusions. London: Penguin.
 
Deakin, S. and Konzelmann, S. J. (2003) After ENRON: An Age of Enlightenment?, Organization, Vol. 10, Issue 3, pp. 583-587.
 
Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room (2005)
 
Inside Job (US, 2010)
 
Koen, C. I. (2005) Comparative International Management, London: McGraw-Hill. Chapter 6: Comparative Corporate Governance.
 
McLean, B. (2008) Enron was the pit canary, but its death went unheeded. The Guardian, 4 October.
 
Plesch, D. and Blakenburg, S. (2008) How to Make Corporations Accountable, Liverpool: The Institute of Employment Rights. OR Plesch, D. and Blakenburg, S. (2007) Corporate Rights and Responsibilities: Restoring Legal Accountability, London: RSA.
 
Stiglitz, J. (2009) Freefall: free markets and the sinking of the global economy. London: Penguin.
 
Sorge, A., Noorderhaven, N., and Koen, C. (2015) Comparative International Management. Second Edition. Abingdon: Routledge. Chapter 6: Comparative Corporate Governance.
 
 
TOPIC 9: ‘Globalisation shows that most countries are converging towards the Anglo-Saxon model thus proving its superiority over the Rhine model’. Discuss.
 
Essential reading includes, but it is not limited to:
 
Albert, M. (1993) Capitalism vs. Capitalism, New York: Four Wall Eight Windows. Chapter 6: The Other Capitalism, pp. 99-126 & Chapter 7: The Economic Superiority of the Rhine Model, pp. 127-146.
 
Chang, Ha-Joon (2010) 23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism. Conclusions. London: Penguin.
 
Dore, R. (2006) Stock Market Capitalism, Welfare Capitalism. Japan and Germany versus the Anglo-Saxons, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Chapter 11: Nice Guys Finish Last? (pp. 219-239).
 
Dore, R., Lazonick, W., and O’Sullivan, M. (1999) ‘Varieties of Capitalism in the Twentieth Century’, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 15, 4, 102-120.
 
Inside Job (US, 2010)
 
Koen, C. I. (2005) Comparative International Management, London: McGraw-Hill. Chapter 12: Globalisation.
 
Sorge, A., Noorderhaven, N., and Koen, C. (2015) Comparative International Management. Second Edition. Abingdon: Routledge. Chapter 11: Globalisation
 
Stiglitz, J. (2009) Freefall: free markets and the sinking of the global economy. London: Penguin.
 
Streeck, W. (1996) German Capitalism: Does it Exist? Can it Survive? In Crouch, C. and Streeck, W. (eds) Modern Capitalism or Modern Capitalisms?
 
 
TOPIC 10: ‘More equal societies almost always do better’ (Wilkinson and Pickett, 2012). Discuss with reference to socio-economic outcomes in LMEs and CMEs.
 
Essential reading includes, but it is not limited to:
 
Albert, M. (1993) Capitalism vs. Capitalism, New York: Four Wall Eight Windows. Chapter 6: The Other Capitalism, pp. 99-126 & Chapter 7: The Economic Superiority of the Rhine Model, pp. 127-146.
 
Chang, Ha-Joon (2010) 23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism. Conclusions. London: Penguin.
 
Data on trade union member and density. OECD; Eurofound; and Worker Participation EU.
 
Dore, R., Lazonick, W., and O’Sullivan, M. (1999) ‘Varieties of Capitalism in the Twentieth Century’, Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 15, 4, 102-120.
 
Global Competitiveness Report.
 
Inside Job (US, 2010)
 
Koen, C. I. (2005) Comparative International Management, London: McGraw-Hill. Chapter 12: Globalisation.
 
Snowdon, C. J. (2011) The Spirit Level Delusion: Fact-checking the Left’s New Theory of Everything. The Democracy Institute.
 
Streeck, W. (1996) German Capitalism: Does it Exist? Can it Survive? In Crouch, C. and Streeck, W. (eds) Modern Capitalism or Modern Capitalisms?
 
Wilkinson, R. And Pickett, K. (2009) The Spirit Level: Why Equality is Better for Everyone. London: Penguin.
 
Wilkinson, R. And Pickett, K. (2012) The authors respond to questions about The Spirit Level’s analysis.
http://www.equalitytrust.org.uk/resources/authors-respond-questions-about-spirit-levels-analysis
 
Sorge, A., Noorderhaven, N., and Koen, C. (2015) Comparative International Management. Second Edition. Abingdon: Routledge. Chapter 11: Globalisation
 
UNDP Human Development Report.
 
 
 
 

  1. Essay writing

 
 
Content
 

  • Do answer the question given paying attention to its different elements.
  • Identify key issues – make sure you comment on problematic areas, and do not be frightened to suggest that there is no clear-cut answer: essays are supposed to provide a discussion and debate.
  • Present a coherent argument and a logical structure so that related ideas are grouped together and there is a logical progression from one area of discussion to another. Refer back to the question, too, to demonstrate how your argument and comment relates to it.

 
 
Basic Structure
 
Each essay will be different but a typical structure will normally consist of:
 

  • Introduction (250 words) where you let the reader know how you interpret the question and how plan to answer it.
  • Body (2000 words) where you develop your argument.
  • Conclusions (250 words) where you finish your essay by referring back to the question and clearly stating how you answered it. No new content here.
  • Bibliography (no word limit) where you include all works cited in your essay (‘references’) as well as those works you consulted but not cited (‘works also consulted’).

 
Format
 

  • Use font Times New Roman size 12 (black), with 1.5 line spacing.
  • Indicate the exact word count of your essay on the last page.
  • Use correct spelling, punctuation and grammar. Do not use reductions (can’t; don’t etc – instead cannot, do not etc.). Pay attention to font and layout – do not use italics throughout, for example, and avoid fancy typefaces. Space out your paragraphs and provide a margin for markers’ comments.

 
Referencing
 

  • Refer to the literature and incorporate concepts, frameworks, models and theories into your discussion. Having done so, attribute these – explain who developed a particular model or idea, who carried out the research to which you have referred, etc.
  • Any quotations used in your work must be acknowledged by giving their source (Author, Book Title, Publisher, Year, pages). Give the author’s name and year of publication immediately after the quotation in brackets (Handy, 1998) and the full reference (Handy, C The Hungry Spirit London: Arrow Books 1998 pp 187-9) in the bibliography at the end of your essay. Any ideas you take from a book, a website or other source must be acknowledged by reference to the author and book as above, and the details of the book must be included in a bibliography. Failure to do so will constitute plagiarism.

 
 
Plagiarism
 
Plagiarism occurs when you present other people’s ideas or choice of words as if they were your own. This can be deliberate, careless, or unconscious but in all cases extremely serious. Cases of plagiarism have increased in recent years partly due to ‘essay banks’ on the internet. In line with most institutions in the UK, the university will scan your work electronically to check for plagiarism.
 
All cases of plagiarism will be referred to the University’s investigation procedure, which has the power to impose penalties up to and including exclusion from your course. Please do not cause yourself this problem.
 
For further information, please refer to the university’s library guidelines on ‘How to Reference Your Work’. For further guidance look at Patriquin’s (2003) notes on ‘Plagiarism, Citation, Quotation’.
 
ALL SUSPECTED CASES OF PLAGIARISM
WILL BE REFERRED TO STUDENT REGULATIONS
 
 


 

  1. General marking criteria

 
Students will be assessed on the extent to which they answer the question satisfactorily, demonstrating an ability to make comparisons between societies and to critically analyse issues in comparative international management.
 
 
70-100: Excellent work. Well structured and argued. Sophisticated understanding/synthesis/use of material based on the module. Original.
 
60-69: Very good work. Well organised and argued. Appropriate/competent use of material based on the module. Analytical, thoughtful.
 
50-59: Good work. Reasonably well organised and argued. Overall accurate/clear use of material based on the module. Some discussion but largely descriptive.
 
40-49: Satisfactory wok. Work that reaches overall standard expected, but that omits/contain errors in use of material based on the module. Descriptive with inaccuracies.
 
35-39: Unsatisfactory work. This is for work that fails to reach the standard expected for Level 6 students. Limited use of acceptable material based on the module. Significant errors/omissions. Fails to answer the question posed.
 
0-34: Poor work. Work that shows basic lack of knowledge and ability. Poor use of material based on the module. Significant errors/omissions. Fails to answer the question posed. Incoherent, unsupported.
 
 
 
 

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