Topics for the Research Paper:  

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

GET A 40% DISCOUNT ON YOU FIRST ORDER

ORDER NOW DISCOUNT CODE >>>> WELCOME40

Topics for the Research Paper:
Write a paper of 1650 words (double-spaced typed pages), developing one of the topics listed below.  Each topic asks students to develop a comparison of the scholarship (1 article or essay each) on the work of men and women artists of the Renaissance and the Baroque.  Students are to assess two articles or book chapters on the artists selected for comparison.  They are to consider the methodology employed by the scholars and the key assumptions made in each essay. The required paper is a test of your ability to analyze the scholarship in terms of methodological issues.  It should note how scholars assess the style of the art; the iconography or subject matter; and the social context.  What does the scholarship on male and female artists tell us about the issues addressed in the course, such as whether women had a Renaissance?
The assignment asks students to consult a body of scholarship such as scholarly essays and books and to conduct research, locate sources and take notes.  Select a topic from the assignments, or develop a topic in concert with the instructor.  Conduct enough general research to develop a worthwhile paper topic.  Relate the material to the issues developed in the course.
Compare scholarship on Sofonisba Anguissola and a male portrait painter of the Renaissance or Baroque, such Titian or Caravaggio.
Compare scholarship on Artemisia Gentileschi and Caravaggio or Orazio Gentileschi.
Compare scholarship on Judith Leyster and Frans Hals, Johannes Vermeer, or Rembrandt van Rijn.
Compare scholarship on Cecilia and Maria Sobrino and Diego Velázquez.
Compare scholarship on Angelica Kauffmann and Jacques Louis David.
Compare scholarship on Elisabeth Vigée-LeBrun and Fragonard.  See, for example, the studies by Mary Sherriff.
The Writing Process:
At the beginning of the writing process develop an outline.  Produce a draft of the paper and edit and rewrite until the paper is well organized.
For the final copy use 8.5 x 11 inch paper.  Please type, double-spacing, and numbering each page with a margin of at least one inch all around.  Give your paper an appropriate title.  Start the paper with a thesis or statement of the main point.  Don’t address peripheral concerns.  The paper should be consistent in content and tone.  Organize the paper into coherent paragraphs.  Begin each paragraph with a clear topic sentence.  Then elaborate with evidence and examples.
Summarize an author’s main points using your own words.  Avoid long direct quotations.  Define unfamiliar terms.  Include photocopies of images as illustrations.  Many are available from ARTstor.  The images can be added to the end of the paper and labeled as figure 1, figure 2, etc.  Please do not include the images with the text when the paper is submitted to the folder in Moodle.
Include proper citations for all research.  Develop endnotes and a bibliography for the term paper.  Acknowledge sources in endnotes when directly quoting from a work; when summarizing or paraphrasing an author’s ideas; and when using an idea from a specific text.  It is important to include all sources in a bibliography at the end of the paper.  Refer to a bibliographic guide such as Sylvan Barnet, A Short Guide to Writing About Art, 2d ed. (Boston:  Little, Brown, 1985) or Joseph Gibaldi, MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 4th ed.(New York:  The Modern Language Association of America, 1995), for information regarding endnotes and bibliographies.
An example of an endnote for a journal, from Barnet:
1  Anne H.  Van Buren, “Madame Cezanne’s Fashions and Dates of Her Portraits,” Art Quarterly, 29 (1966), 119.
A sample bibliographic entry is as follows:
Caviness, Madeline Harrison.  The Early Stained Glass of Canterbury Cathedral.  Princeton:
Princeton University Press, 977.
The basic bibliographic format for WWW Site Sources, from Xia Li and Nancy B. Crane, Electronic Style:  A Guide to Citing Electronic Information (Meckler, 1993):
DeAngelis, T. (1995).  A nation of hermits:  The loss of community.  APA Monitor.  [Online].
Available:  http://www.apa.org/monitor/sep95/isolatea.html.
The Modern Language Association (MLA) has provisions for in-text citations using parentheses.  Include the name of the author and the page number in parentheses (Frye 24) within the body of the paper.  It is necessary to provide a complete listing of the source in a section titled, Works Cited, with entries for each work, such as:
Frye, Northrop.  Anatomy of Criticism:  Four Essays.  Princeton: Princeton UP, 1957.
Course Bibliography
Adams, Laurie Schneider.  Key Monuments of the Baroque. Boulder, Co.:  Icon Editions,
Westview Press, 2000.
Alpers, Svetlana.  “Art History and Its Exclusions:  The Example of Dutch Art,” in Feminism and
Art History: Questioning the Litany, edited by Norma Broude and Mary D. Garrard.  N.Y.:
Harper and Row, 1982:  183-200.
———. “Interpretation without Representation, or, the viewing of Las Meninas,”
Representations,1 (Feb. 1983):  30-42.
Baldinucci, Filippo. The life of Bernini.  Translated by Catherine Engass.  University Park, Pa.:
Pennsylvania State University Press, 1966.
Battiferri degli Ammannati, Laura and Victoria Kirkham. Laura Battiferra and her literary circle:
an anthology.  Chicago:  University of Chicago Press, 2006.
Berger, John.  Ways of Seeing.  London:  British Broadcasting Corporation, 1972.
Brown, Clifford M. Isabella d’Este and Lorenzo da Pavia:  documents for the history of art and
culture in Renaissance Mantua. Genève: Librairie Droz,1982.
Carroll, Margaret. “The Erotics of Absolutism:  Rubens and the Mystification of Sexual Violence,”
Representations 25 (Winter 1989):  3-30.
Castiglione, Baldassare.  Il Cortegiano (1528).  The Book of the Courtier.  Trans. C. S. Singleton.
New York:  Garden City, 1959.
Cheney, Liana De Girolamo Alicia Craig Faxon, Kathleen Lucey Russo.  Self-portraits by women
painters.  Aldershot, Hants, England; Brookfield, VT:  Ashgate, 2000.
Christiansen, Keith and Judith Mann.  Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi.  New York:  Metropolitan
Museum of Art; New Haven:  Yale University Press, 2001.
Cohen, Elizabeth.  “The Trials of Artemisia Gentileschi:  A Rape as History.”  Sixteenth Century
Journal  31, 1 (2000):  45-75.
Cropper, Elizabeth.  “On Beautiful Women, Parmigianino, Petrarchismo, and the Vernacular
Style,” Art Bulletin 58, 3 (Sept. 1976):  374-394.
Even, Yael.  “Judith Leyster:  an Unsuitable Place for a Woman.”  Konsthistorisk Tidskrift 71, 3
(2002):  115-124.
Garrard, Mary.  “Artemisa and Susanna,” in Feminism and Art History: Questioning the Litany,
edited by Norma Broude and Mary D. Garrard.  N.Y.:  Harper and Row, 1982:  147-171.
——–.  “Here’s Looking at Me:  Sofonisba Anguissola and the Problem of the Woman
Artist,” Renaissance Quarterly 47, 3 (Autumn 1994):  556-662.
Goffen, Rona.  “Raphael’s Designer Labels:  From the Virgin Mary to La Fornarina,” Artibus et
Historiae 24, 48 (2003):  123-142.
——–.  “Titian’s Sacred and Profane Love and Marriage,” in The Expanding Discourse:
Feminism and Art History, edited by Norma Broude and Mary D. Garrard.  N.Y.:
HarperCollins, 1992:  111-125.
Hibbard, Howard.  Caravaggio.  New York:  Harper & Row, 1983.
Jacobs, Frederika. Defining the Renaissance virtuosa:  women artists and the language of art
history and criticism.  Cambridge; New York:  Cambridge University Press, 1997.
———-.  “Woman’s Capacity to Create:  The Unusual Case of Sofonisba Anguissola,”
Renaissance Quarterly. 47, 1 (Spring 1994):  74-101.
Kelly, Joan.  “Did Women Have a Renaissance?”, Women, History & Theory:  The Essays of
Joan Kelly.  Chicago and London:  U of Chicago, 1984:  20-50.
King, Catherine. “Looking a Sight:  Sixteenth-Century Portraits of Woman Artists,” Zeitschrift für
Kunstgeschichte, 58, 3 (1995):  381-406.
———.  “Medieval and Renaissance Matrons, Italian-Style,” Zeitschrift fur
Kunstgeschichte 55, 3 (1992):  342-393.
Kramer, Heinrich. Malleus Maleficarum. Translated by Rev. Montague Summers. London: J.
Rodker, 1928.
Kraus, Henry.  “Eve and Mary:  Conflicting Images of Medieval Woman,” Feminism and Art
History:  Questioning the Litany, edited by Norma Broude and Mary D. Garrard.  N.Y.:  Harper
and Row, 1982:  78-99.
Kristeva,  Julia.  “Motherhood According to Giovanni Bellini,” Desire in Language:  A Semiotic
Approach to Literature and Art.  N.Y.:  Columbia University Press, 1980:  237-270.
Mander, Carel van and Hessel Miedema.  The lives of the illustrious Netherlandish and German
painters, from the first edition of the “Schilder-boeck” (1603-1604).  6 volumes. Doornspijk:
Davaco, 1994-1999.
McIver, Katherine.  “Lavinia Fontana’s “Self-Portrait Making Music””, Woman’s Art Journal 19, 1
(Spring – Summer 1998):  3-8.
Murphy,  Caroline P.  “Lavinia Fontana and Female Life Cycle Experience in Late Sixteenth-
Century Bologna,” Picturing Women in Renaissance and Baroque Italy, edited by Geraldine A.
Johnson and Sara F. Matthews Grieco.  Cambridge:  Cambridge University Press, 1997:
111-138.
Nochlin, Linda. “Why Are There No Great Women Artists?”, Art News 69, 9 (January 1971):  67-
71.
San Juan, Rose Marie. “The Court Lady’s Dilemma:  Isabella D’ Este and Art Collecting in the
Renaissance,” Oxford Art Journal 14, 1 (1991):  67-78.
Schama, Simon. The embarrassment of riches:  an interpretation of Dutch Culture in the Golden
Age.  New York:  Knopf, 1987.
———-.  The power of art.  New York:  Ecco, 2006.
Sheriff, Mary.  The exceptional woman : Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun and the cultural politics of art.
Chicago:  University of Chicago Press, 1996.
———.  Fragonard and eroticism.  Chicago:  University of Chicago Press, 1990.
Silvers,  Anita.  “Has Her(oine’s) Time Come?,” The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48, 4
(Autumn 1990):  365-379.
Simons, Patricia.  “Women in Frames:  The Gaze, the Eye, the Profile in Renaissance Portraiture”
in The Expanding Discourse: Feminism and Art History, edited by Norma Broude and Mary D.
Garrard.  N.Y.:  HarperCollins, 1992:  39-58.
Slatkin, Wendy.  “Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun (1755-1842)” in The Voices of Women Artists.
Englewood Cliffs, N.J.:  Prentice Hall, 1993:  25-43.
Taggard, Mindy.  “Art and Alienation in Early Modern Spanish Convents” South Atlantic Review
65, 1 (Winter 2000):  24-40.
Teresa, of Avila Saint, E. Allison Peers, Silverio. of St. Teresa.  The Complete Works of St.Teresa
of Jesus.  London:  Sheed and Ward, 1972.
Tingali, Paola.  Women in Italian Renaissance Art:  Gender, Representation and Identity.
Manchester, England:  Manchester Univeristy Press, 1997.
Vasari, Giorgio.  The Lives of the Artists.  Translation by Julia Conaway Bonadella and Peter
Bonadella.  Oxford:  Oxford University Press, 1991.
Wiseman, Mary Bittner.  “Renaissance Madonnas and the Fantasies of Freud,” Hypatia 8, 3
(Summer 1993):  115-135.
Witthoft, Brucia.  “Marriage Rituals and Marriage Chests in Quattrocento Florence,” Artibus et
Historiae  3, 5 (1982):  43-59.
Extra Credit PowerPoint Assignment (1-5 pts)  Due the day of the term paper assignment
Develop a PowerPoint slideshow that outlines the topic of your term paper for the course. The PowerPoint is an opportunity to highlight key points from your term paper and to include illustrations. It should also include some of the sources that were consulted as Works Cited.
Include a title slide that includes your name, the title of your paper, the class name, number, and semester. Example:  John Smith, Eco on Aesthetics/ Art 481: Women in the Art of the Renaissance and Baroque, Spring 2016. Include individual slides that outline major points developed in your term paper.  The material should show that you conducted research and interpreted information. Use at least 24-point font and limit information to two or three sentences per slide or to a few bulleted lists. Vary the format of the slides and include appropriate graphics. Search for illustrations from the ARTstor database and other sources and include a brief label that identifies the work of art. It is customary to include the name of the artist, the title of the object, and the date. Sometimes it is helpful to note the media and dimensions of the object.
The Works Cited section may include web page addresses (with the URL, universal resource locator) for image source references and other reference material. You may want to begin searching for information in Grove Art online.  Also refer to more in-depth studies available at Ellender Memorial Library and in the Library Databases such as Arts & Sciences Collections / JSTOR. The Works Cited does not have to include all items discussed in your term paper just the most significant research materials.
Please send a copy of the completed PowerPoint to the instructor’s e-mail address when the term paper assignment is due. The PowerPoint can be labeled using your last name followed by .ppt (smith.ppt).    The file can be added as an attachment to the e-mail message. Please note that you will receive a message confirming that the material has been received. The PowerPoint may be posted in the Discussion Board of Blackboard as an example of student work next semester. See examples of student work posted from previous semesters.
Evaluation Rubrics for PowerPoint
Total Points Possible =  5

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

GET A 40% DISCOUNT ON YOU FIRST ORDER

ORDER NOW DISCOUNT CODE >>>> WELCOME40

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized

Topics for the Research Paper:  

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

GET A 40% DISCOUNT ON YOU FIRST ORDER

ORDER NOW DISCOUNT CODE >>>> WELCOME40

Topics for the Research Paper:
Write a paper of 1650 words (double-spaced typed pages), developing one of the topics listed below.  Each topic asks students to develop a comparison of the scholarship (1 article or essay each) on the work of men and women artists of the Renaissance and the Baroque.  Students are to assess two articles or book chapters on the artists selected for comparison.  They are to consider the methodology employed by the scholars and the key assumptions made in each essay. The required paper is a test of your ability to analyze the scholarship in terms of methodological issues.  It should note how scholars assess the style of the art; the iconography or subject matter; and the social context.  What does the scholarship on male and female artists tell us about the issues addressed in the course, such as whether women had a Renaissance?
The assignment asks students to consult a body of scholarship such as scholarly essays and books and to conduct research, locate sources and take notes.  Select a topic from the assignments, or develop a topic in concert with the instructor.  Conduct enough general research to develop a worthwhile paper topic.  Relate the material to the issues developed in the course.
Compare scholarship on Sofonisba Anguissola and a male portrait painter of the Renaissance or Baroque, such Titian or Caravaggio.
Compare scholarship on Artemisia Gentileschi and Caravaggio or Orazio Gentileschi.
Compare scholarship on Judith Leyster and Frans Hals, Johannes Vermeer, or Rembrandt van Rijn.
Compare scholarship on Cecilia and Maria Sobrino and Diego Velázquez.
Compare scholarship on Angelica Kauffmann and Jacques Louis David.
Compare scholarship on Elisabeth Vigée-LeBrun and Fragonard.  See, for example, the studies by Mary Sherriff.
The Writing Process:
At the beginning of the writing process develop an outline.  Produce a draft of the paper and edit and rewrite until the paper is well organized.
For the final copy use 8.5 x 11 inch paper.  Please type, double-spacing, and numbering each page with a margin of at least one inch all around.  Give your paper an appropriate title.  Start the paper with a thesis or statement of the main point.  Don’t address peripheral concerns.  The paper should be consistent in content and tone.  Organize the paper into coherent paragraphs.  Begin each paragraph with a clear topic sentence.  Then elaborate with evidence and examples.
Summarize an author’s main points using your own words.  Avoid long direct quotations.  Define unfamiliar terms.  Include photocopies of images as illustrations.  Many are available from ARTstor.  The images can be added to the end of the paper and labeled as figure 1, figure 2, etc.  Please do not include the images with the text when the paper is submitted to the folder in Moodle.
Include proper citations for all research.  Develop endnotes and a bibliography for the term paper.  Acknowledge sources in endnotes when directly quoting from a work; when summarizing or paraphrasing an author’s ideas; and when using an idea from a specific text.  It is important to include all sources in a bibliography at the end of the paper.  Refer to a bibliographic guide such as Sylvan Barnet, A Short Guide to Writing About Art, 2d ed. (Boston:  Little, Brown, 1985) or Joseph Gibaldi, MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 4th ed.(New York:  The Modern Language Association of America, 1995), for information regarding endnotes and bibliographies.
An example of an endnote for a journal, from Barnet:
1  Anne H.  Van Buren, “Madame Cezanne’s Fashions and Dates of Her Portraits,” Art Quarterly, 29 (1966), 119.
A sample bibliographic entry is as follows:
Caviness, Madeline Harrison.  The Early Stained Glass of Canterbury Cathedral.  Princeton:
Princeton University Press, 977.
The basic bibliographic format for WWW Site Sources, from Xia Li and Nancy B. Crane, Electronic Style:  A Guide to Citing Electronic Information (Meckler, 1993):
DeAngelis, T. (1995).  A nation of hermits:  The loss of community.  APA Monitor.  [Online].
Available:  http://www.apa.org/monitor/sep95/isolatea.html.
The Modern Language Association (MLA) has provisions for in-text citations using parentheses.  Include the name of the author and the page number in parentheses (Frye 24) within the body of the paper.  It is necessary to provide a complete listing of the source in a section titled, Works Cited, with entries for each work, such as:
Frye, Northrop.  Anatomy of Criticism:  Four Essays.  Princeton: Princeton UP, 1957.
Course Bibliography
Adams, Laurie Schneider.  Key Monuments of the Baroque. Boulder, Co.:  Icon Editions,
Westview Press, 2000.
Alpers, Svetlana.  “Art History and Its Exclusions:  The Example of Dutch Art,” in Feminism and
Art History: Questioning the Litany, edited by Norma Broude and Mary D. Garrard.  N.Y.:
Harper and Row, 1982:  183-200.
———. “Interpretation without Representation, or, the viewing of Las Meninas,”
Representations,1 (Feb. 1983):  30-42.
Baldinucci, Filippo. The life of Bernini.  Translated by Catherine Engass.  University Park, Pa.:
Pennsylvania State University Press, 1966.
Battiferri degli Ammannati, Laura and Victoria Kirkham. Laura Battiferra and her literary circle:
an anthology.  Chicago:  University of Chicago Press, 2006.
Berger, John.  Ways of Seeing.  London:  British Broadcasting Corporation, 1972.
Brown, Clifford M. Isabella d’Este and Lorenzo da Pavia:  documents for the history of art and
culture in Renaissance Mantua. Genève: Librairie Droz,1982.
Carroll, Margaret. “The Erotics of Absolutism:  Rubens and the Mystification of Sexual Violence,”
Representations 25 (Winter 1989):  3-30.
Castiglione, Baldassare.  Il Cortegiano (1528).  The Book of the Courtier.  Trans. C. S. Singleton.
New York:  Garden City, 1959.
Cheney, Liana De Girolamo Alicia Craig Faxon, Kathleen Lucey Russo.  Self-portraits by women
painters.  Aldershot, Hants, England; Brookfield, VT:  Ashgate, 2000.
Christiansen, Keith and Judith Mann.  Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi.  New York:  Metropolitan
Museum of Art; New Haven:  Yale University Press, 2001.
Cohen, Elizabeth.  “The Trials of Artemisia Gentileschi:  A Rape as History.”  Sixteenth Century
Journal  31, 1 (2000):  45-75.
Cropper, Elizabeth.  “On Beautiful Women, Parmigianino, Petrarchismo, and the Vernacular
Style,” Art Bulletin 58, 3 (Sept. 1976):  374-394.
Even, Yael.  “Judith Leyster:  an Unsuitable Place for a Woman.”  Konsthistorisk Tidskrift 71, 3
(2002):  115-124.
Garrard, Mary.  “Artemisa and Susanna,” in Feminism and Art History: Questioning the Litany,
edited by Norma Broude and Mary D. Garrard.  N.Y.:  Harper and Row, 1982:  147-171.
——–.  “Here’s Looking at Me:  Sofonisba Anguissola and the Problem of the Woman
Artist,” Renaissance Quarterly 47, 3 (Autumn 1994):  556-662.
Goffen, Rona.  “Raphael’s Designer Labels:  From the Virgin Mary to La Fornarina,” Artibus et
Historiae 24, 48 (2003):  123-142.
——–.  “Titian’s Sacred and Profane Love and Marriage,” in The Expanding Discourse:
Feminism and Art History, edited by Norma Broude and Mary D. Garrard.  N.Y.:
HarperCollins, 1992:  111-125.
Hibbard, Howard.  Caravaggio.  New York:  Harper & Row, 1983.
Jacobs, Frederika. Defining the Renaissance virtuosa:  women artists and the language of art
history and criticism.  Cambridge; New York:  Cambridge University Press, 1997.
———-.  “Woman’s Capacity to Create:  The Unusual Case of Sofonisba Anguissola,”
Renaissance Quarterly. 47, 1 (Spring 1994):  74-101.
Kelly, Joan.  “Did Women Have a Renaissance?”, Women, History & Theory:  The Essays of
Joan Kelly.  Chicago and London:  U of Chicago, 1984:  20-50.
King, Catherine. “Looking a Sight:  Sixteenth-Century Portraits of Woman Artists,” Zeitschrift für
Kunstgeschichte, 58, 3 (1995):  381-406.
———.  “Medieval and Renaissance Matrons, Italian-Style,” Zeitschrift fur
Kunstgeschichte 55, 3 (1992):  342-393.
Kramer, Heinrich. Malleus Maleficarum. Translated by Rev. Montague Summers. London: J.
Rodker, 1928.
Kraus, Henry.  “Eve and Mary:  Conflicting Images of Medieval Woman,” Feminism and Art
History:  Questioning the Litany, edited by Norma Broude and Mary D. Garrard.  N.Y.:  Harper
and Row, 1982:  78-99.
Kristeva,  Julia.  “Motherhood According to Giovanni Bellini,” Desire in Language:  A Semiotic
Approach to Literature and Art.  N.Y.:  Columbia University Press, 1980:  237-270.
Mander, Carel van and Hessel Miedema.  The lives of the illustrious Netherlandish and German
painters, from the first edition of the “Schilder-boeck” (1603-1604).  6 volumes. Doornspijk:
Davaco, 1994-1999.
McIver, Katherine.  “Lavinia Fontana’s “Self-Portrait Making Music””, Woman’s Art Journal 19, 1
(Spring – Summer 1998):  3-8.
Murphy,  Caroline P.  “Lavinia Fontana and Female Life Cycle Experience in Late Sixteenth-
Century Bologna,” Picturing Women in Renaissance and Baroque Italy, edited by Geraldine A.
Johnson and Sara F. Matthews Grieco.  Cambridge:  Cambridge University Press, 1997:
111-138.
Nochlin, Linda. “Why Are There No Great Women Artists?”, Art News 69, 9 (January 1971):  67-
71.
San Juan, Rose Marie. “The Court Lady’s Dilemma:  Isabella D’ Este and Art Collecting in the
Renaissance,” Oxford Art Journal 14, 1 (1991):  67-78.
Schama, Simon. The embarrassment of riches:  an interpretation of Dutch Culture in the Golden
Age.  New York:  Knopf, 1987.
———-.  The power of art.  New York:  Ecco, 2006.
Sheriff, Mary.  The exceptional woman : Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun and the cultural politics of art.
Chicago:  University of Chicago Press, 1996.
———.  Fragonard and eroticism.  Chicago:  University of Chicago Press, 1990.
Silvers,  Anita.  “Has Her(oine’s) Time Come?,” The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48, 4
(Autumn 1990):  365-379.
Simons, Patricia.  “Women in Frames:  The Gaze, the Eye, the Profile in Renaissance Portraiture”
in The Expanding Discourse: Feminism and Art History, edited by Norma Broude and Mary D.
Garrard.  N.Y.:  HarperCollins, 1992:  39-58.
Slatkin, Wendy.  “Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun (1755-1842)” in The Voices of Women Artists.
Englewood Cliffs, N.J.:  Prentice Hall, 1993:  25-43.
Taggard, Mindy.  “Art and Alienation in Early Modern Spanish Convents” South Atlantic Review
65, 1 (Winter 2000):  24-40.
Teresa, of Avila Saint, E. Allison Peers, Silverio. of St. Teresa.  The Complete Works of St.Teresa
of Jesus.  London:  Sheed and Ward, 1972.
Tingali, Paola.  Women in Italian Renaissance Art:  Gender, Representation and Identity.
Manchester, England:  Manchester Univeristy Press, 1997.
Vasari, Giorgio.  The Lives of the Artists.  Translation by Julia Conaway Bonadella and Peter
Bonadella.  Oxford:  Oxford University Press, 1991.
Wiseman, Mary Bittner.  “Renaissance Madonnas and the Fantasies of Freud,” Hypatia 8, 3
(Summer 1993):  115-135.
Witthoft, Brucia.  “Marriage Rituals and Marriage Chests in Quattrocento Florence,” Artibus et
Historiae  3, 5 (1982):  43-59.
Extra Credit PowerPoint Assignment (1-5 pts)  Due the day of the term paper assignment
Develop a PowerPoint slideshow that outlines the topic of your term paper for the course. The PowerPoint is an opportunity to highlight key points from your term paper and to include illustrations. It should also include some of the sources that were consulted as Works Cited.
Include a title slide that includes your name, the title of your paper, the class name, number, and semester. Example:  John Smith, Eco on Aesthetics/ Art 481: Women in the Art of the Renaissance and Baroque, Spring 2016. Include individual slides that outline major points developed in your term paper.  The material should show that you conducted research and interpreted information. Use at least 24-point font and limit information to two or three sentences per slide or to a few bulleted lists. Vary the format of the slides and include appropriate graphics. Search for illustrations from the ARTstor database and other sources and include a brief label that identifies the work of art. It is customary to include the name of the artist, the title of the object, and the date. Sometimes it is helpful to note the media and dimensions of the object.
The Works Cited section may include web page addresses (with the URL, universal resource locator) for image source references and other reference material. You may want to begin searching for information in Grove Art online.  Also refer to more in-depth studies available at Ellender Memorial Library and in the Library Databases such as Arts & Sciences Collections / JSTOR. The Works Cited does not have to include all items discussed in your term paper just the most significant research materials.
Please send a copy of the completed PowerPoint to the instructor’s e-mail address when the term paper assignment is due. The PowerPoint can be labeled using your last name followed by .ppt (smith.ppt).    The file can be added as an attachment to the e-mail message. Please note that you will receive a message confirming that the material has been received. The PowerPoint may be posted in the Discussion Board of Blackboard as an example of student work next semester. See examples of student work posted from previous semesters.
Evaluation Rubrics for PowerPoint
Total Points Possible =  5

Our academic experts are ready and waiting to assist with any writing project you may have. From simple essay plans, through to full dissertations, you can guarantee we have a service perfectly matched to your needs.

GET A 40% DISCOUNT ON YOU FIRST ORDER

ORDER NOW DISCOUNT CODE >>>> WELCOME40

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized