Using 8 ½” x 11” paper that can be scanned, or using Microsoft Word graphics fea

Using 8 ½” x 11” paper that can be scanned, or using Microsoft Word graphics fea

Using 8 ½” x 11” paper that can be scanned, or using Microsoft Word graphics features, create a Medicine Wheel with four quadrants and a center. Label each quadrant according to traditional Native American qualities, using the module content and readings as a guide. Then, identify an issue that you would like to address on a family, community or organizational level and write it above the Medicine Wheel. This issue should be expressed in systemic, non-blaming terms. The issue may relate to colonization, but it doesn’t have to. Three examples:
“We have difficulty communicating about issues related to power and decisions.”
“Undocumented families are afraid to report crimes in our neighborhood.” (USE THIS EXAMPLE FOR WHEEL AND PAPER)
“LGBTQ individuals feel they cannot be themselves in our school.”
If you are currently working in a setting conducive to group discussions, you may ask permission from your supervisor to facilitate a meeting using the Medicine Wheel as a discussion guide. If a group of peers or your family has an issue to address, then you may ask their permission to hold a talking circle. Otherwise, you will need to use your knowledge of a community concern to imagine the responses to your questions. See the video resources for ideas.
For each quadrant, design one question about the issue that is relevant to the focus of that quadrant. Feel free to reach out to your instructor (or someone who knows you well) if you need help coming up with useful questions. You may follow the guidance in Absolon (2012), but feel free to deviate if the steps do not align well with the chosen issue. What is important is to relate the qualities of the four quadrants to your questions.
Option 2: Introspection/imaginary group setting
Set up a quiet space and create an optimal environment for introspection. Choose a time to hold each question in mind, sitting quietly for at least five minutes and allowing responses to come to you. If it helps, you can visualize asking the questions of a group from the community. Write down your impressions afterward on a separate paper or document. You may complete all four directions at once or break them up. For the center, hold the questions above in mind as you visualize yourself standing in the center of the Medicine Wheel.
To complete the written assignment, include a title page in APA format, a description of the issue you chose to focus on, the Medicine Wheel on a separate age, all of the questions and responses to those questions from your group meeting or your introspection. Conclude with your comments on what you found valuable and challenging as you went through this process, and how you might see yourself using this method in social work practice with a colonized community.
Be sure to provide a wheel along with paper. The sample paper is attached.
Please be mindful of the following:
– use section headings shown in the sample paper
– include an actual Medicine Wheel diagram with the appropriate colors of the four quadrants of the wheel each section with actual exercise questions – do not make up your own colors.
– you must have a “Center” section to your wheel.
– note that there is an process commentary and application section
MODULE CONTENT AND READINGS:
Absolon, K. (2010). Indigenous wholistic theory: A knowledge set for practice. First Peoples Child & Family Review, 5(2), 74-87.
Marshall, W. E. (2011). Potent mana: Lessons in healing and power. State University of New York Press.
Use of references from the course materials as required and outside sources if needed. Peer review journals, historical and legal documents, books, some official professional websites etc are credible sources.

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