WIT ENG1100

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WIT
ENG1100
Take Home Final Spring 2018
Instructions
Your take-home final exam will consist to a properly MLA-formatted 2-3 page essay in which
you summarize and critique the article, “Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation” by Jean M.
Twenge.
The article appeared in the online version of the Atlantic on 19 March 2018. It is unpaginated,
but for the purpose of this essay, you should used the page numbers indicated on the PDF for
your citations.
The basic works cited citation that you will need to format is:
Twenge, Jean M. “Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?” The Atlantic, Atlantic Media
Company, 19 Mar. 2018, www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/09/has-the-smartphonedestroyed-a-generation/534198/.
You should:
1. Read the article carefully.
2. Take a position on the issues raised.
3. Summarize Twenge’s argument (her major claims and key evidence)
4. Assess the persuasiveness of the argument: why and how is it convincing; why and how
is it unconvincing?
5. To support your assessment, you will need to provide a relevant quotation from a scource
that either supports Twenge’s position or challenges it. The source should be either a
book, a journal article, or a web source from one of WIT’s online databases. Add your
source to the essay’s works cited page.
Your essay will be assessed by 1) the thoroughness of your summary (that relies on direct
quotations to summarize the main points and evidence); 2) the persuasiveness of your assessment
(with all assertions properly supported by evidence/examples; 3) the quality of your outside
source and relevance of the quotation used for your argument; 4) correct MLA essay, in-text, and
works cited formatting (use the Checklist to double check your work before submitting).
The take-home final is due by Tuesday, 17 April, at 3.00 pm. No late submissions will be
accepted. A hard-copy should be delivered to me either to my mailbox (not in the tray outside
my office) or in person. You may submit before the 17th, but email me a back-up of your essay.
The essay also must be uploaded to the link in the Assignment folder for our final week on
Blackboard. No essays that have not been uploaded by the deadline will be accepted or assessed.
Checklist for Evaluating MLA Essay Formatting
☐ Font is Times New Roman 12 pt.
☐ Essay is double spaced (and only double spaced). Checked settings to make sure Word is
not adding space when return is hit, i.e., no extra space between paragraphs.
☐ Page numbers are set in upper right hand with last name added to header (in Times New
Roman 12 pt.), one-half-inch from the top of the page.
☐ Margins are set at 1 inch (and no more or less) on top, bottom, right, and left.
☐ Name, etc. in correct MLA order:
Fname Lname
Professor Burt
ENGL1100-07
Day Month Year
☐ Title is in regular type (not in quotes/italics/boldface, etc.); all important words uppercase;
essays/short stories in quotes & novels/books/plays in italic.
☐ Paragraphs are indented five spaces (no less or more).
☐ All punctuation is inside quotation marks.
Checklist for Handling MLA Citations
EVERY borrowed idea must be clearly attributed to the source.
☐ EVERY citation must have:
• A signal phrase introducing/identifying source.
• Word-for-word accurate direct quotation or indirect paraphrase (in your own words and
sentence structure). Direct quotations should be the rule; paraphrase the exception.
• Parenthetical with page reference (if available). Do NOT include author’s name in
parenthetical with signal phrase that identifies source.
☐ All direct quotations set off from signal phrase with a comma or signal sentence with a colon.
For example: According to Orwell, “quote” (36).
Or: Orwell makes it clear how important clarity is in good writing: “quote” (36).
☐ All long quotations (four+ lines of prose) set off by indenting one inch from the left margin.
Introduced by informative sentence followed by a colon. No quotation marks. At end of indented
quotation the parenthetical citation goes outside the final mark of punctuation (see Hacker 616-
17):
quote. (470)
Use minimally: no more than one long quotation per three pages of text. Better to break up
quotation and integrate into your text, rather than setting off in a block, because readers with skip!
☐ All indirect sources (sources quoted in another source) indicated with the abbreviation qtd. in +
source in parenthetical. For example: (qtd. in Burt). (see Hacker 488)
☐ Make sure to establish fully the identity (full name) and authority of the sources (include
title of source in signal phrase).
Works Cited page
☐ On a new page and with proper header and page number.
☐ Centered 1 inch from the top of the page: Works Cited. It’s called Works Cited even if there is
only one work cited!
☐ Citations arranged alphabetically by author or by title if unauthored source. All double spaced
with line one on the left margin and subsequent lines indented one-half inch from the left hand
margin.
☐ Followed this basic format for essay (for others see Hacker or Perdue OWL online:
Sample sources (ignore spacing and indent issues)
Books (print)
Lname, Fname. Title in Italic. Publisher, Publication Date.
Hitchcock, Susan Tyler. Frankenstein: A Cultural History. Norton, 2007.
Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. Edited by J. Paul Hunter, 2nd ed., Norton, 2012.
Books (electronic)
Include with above the URL or DOI if there is one. If not, indicate the specific version in your citation:
MLA Handbook. 8
th ed., Kindle ed., Modern Language Association of America, 2016.
Critical article (collection/anthology)
Author(s). “Title of the Article.” Title of the Book, edited by Fname Lname of editor(s), edition # if not
the first, Publisher, Publication Date, pages.
Levine, George. “Frankenstein and the Tradition of Realism.” Frankenstein, edited by J. Paul Hunter, 2nd
ed., Norton, 2012, pp. 311-316.
Article (print journal)
Author(s). “Title of Article.” Title of Journal in Italic, Volume, Issue, Year, pages.
London, Bette. “Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, and the Spectacle of Masculinity.” PMLA, vol. 108, no. 2,
1993, pp. 253-267.
Article (online database)
Author(s). “Title of Article.” Title of Journal in Italic, Volume, Issue, Year, pages. Title of the database
in italic, DOI or URL.
Langhamer, Claire. “Love and Courtship in Mid-Twentieth-Century England.” Historical
Journal, vol. 50, no. 1, 2007, pp. 173-96. ProQuest, doi:10.1017/S0018246X06005966.
Essay from “They Say/I Say”:
Ungar, Sanford J. “The New Liberal Arts.” “They Say/I Say”: The Moves that Matter in Academic
Writing, edited by Gerald Graff, Cathy Birkenstein, and Russel Durst, 3rd ed., Norton, 2015, pp.
226-232.

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