Your paper should be 1,600–2,000 words in length Include at least one in-text ci

Your paper should be 1,600–2,000 words in length
Include at least one in-text ci

Your paper should be 1,600–2,000 words in length
Include at least one in-text citation for at least one of the required materials mentioned in the prompt and format the citation using MLA
Include a reference list on the final page of your paper for your in-text citations. Format your reference list using MLA
Consider and reply to at least one objection to your argument or thesis (preferably toward the end of your paper). See the previous page for an explanation of what I mean. Do not simply regurgitate an objection or reply from the authors that you are defending or criticizing. Instead, come up with your own objection, paraphrase an objection we discussed in class, or cite an objection from an opposing author. It helps to imagine that you’re having a conversation with a smart person who disagrees with you. For example, if you write a positive paper that defends an author from an objection, you might imagine how a smart person who disagrees with you would respond to your response—and then give a response to their response.
STEP 1: Briefly introduce the reader to the issue, clearly state your thesis, and provide the reader
with a brief preview of how you will support your thesis. (Usually 1 paragraph)
STEP 2: Clarify any technical terminology that you will use; carefully summarize the argument(s) or position(s) that you will defend or criticize; and, if applicable, apply the principle of charity1 to bolster them into their strongest form(s). (Several paragraphs)
STEP 3: Give your own argument(s) for your thesis. (Several paragraphs)
STEP 4: Consider and respond to objections to your arguments. (Usually at least 1 paragraph to explain the objection and at least 1 paragraph to give your response)
STEP 5: Conclude by summarizing what your paper has established. (Usually 1 paragraph)

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