Your assignment is to write a 1500-word paper (about 5 typed, double-spaced page

Your assignment is to write a 1500-word paper (about 5 typed, double-spaced pages) on one
of the work(s) of the figures that we have covered or will cover in the first half of this
course.
A number of Romantic poems are about dejection, loss, or alienation. Choose William
Wordsworth’s poem “The Ruined Cottage” and explain the problem or sorrow it laments
(its nature, source, and consequences), the speaker’s reaction to the problem and the
degree to which a solution is achieved, and the particular images or other poetic techniques
used to convey the mood or dilemma.

 

 

Your assignment is to write a 1500-word paper (about 5 typed, double-spaced page

Your assignment is to write a 1500-word paper (about 5 typed, double-spaced pages) on one
of the work(s) of the figures that we have covered or will cover in the first half of this
course.
A number of Romantic poems are about dejection, loss, or alienation. Choose William
Wordsworth’s poem “The Ruined Cottage” and explain the problem or sorrow it laments
(its nature, source, and consequences), the speaker’s reaction to the problem and the
degree to which a solution is achieved, and the particular images or other poetic techniques
used to convey the mood or dilemma.

 

 

READ EVERYTHING. PLAGIARISM WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED. As sonnets usually do, this s

READ EVERYTHING.
PLAGIARISM WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.
As sonnets usually do, this sonnet must be centered around one clear idea: DIVERSITY. The Sonnet is built on a principle of artistic balance and contrast. The octave (first eight lines) states a problem, raises a doubt, establishes a conflict, or asks a question. The sestet (last six lines) solves the problem, resolves the doubt, or answers the question. The move at line 9 from octave to sestet is known as the volta. Please have some rhyming.
Your poem will be on: DIVERSITY.
Your sonnet must include:
* Poetic diction (i.e., use of words) must be in alignment with the theme you chose from above
* Poetic form (14 lines with a clear volta or turn on line 9)
* 3 different figures of speech: anaphora, metaphor, and simile
* 4 words (verbs or nouns) extracted the following list:
1. pythagorize (definition) To philosophize or speculate in the manner of Pythagoras or the Pythagoreans.
2. taciturn (definition) (of a person) reserved or uncommunicative in speech; saying little.
3. palanquin (definition) (in India and the East) a covered litter for one passenger, consisting of a large box carried on two horizontal poles by four or six bearers.
4. antiquity (definition) the ancient past, especially the period before the Middle Ages.
5. mollusk (definition) an invertebrate of a large phylum which includes snails, slugs, mussels, and octopuses. They have a soft unsegmented body and live in aquatic or damp habitats, and most kinds have an external calcareous shell.
6. Hercules
7. Plato

 

 

First things first, go to this week’s video presentation: https://vimeo.com/4647

First things first, go to this week’s video presentation: https://vimeo.com/464775887. First things first, go to this week’s video presentation: https://vimeo.com/464775887. This week we’re going to try a more playful form of poetry: Syllabic verse.
Syllabic verse is simply based on counting syllables (not musically adhering to a set rhythm like “iambs”).
Your goal is to write TWO syllabic poems: One based on Marianne Moore’s syllabic count in “No Swan So Fine” and another of your own making. At the end of each line, identify the number of syllables. Let’s start with Moore’s poem:
No Swan So Fine
by Marianne Moore
“No water so still as the
dead fountains of Versailles.” No swan,
with swart blind look askance
and gondoliering legs, so fine
as the chinz china one with fawn-
brown eyes and toothed gold
collar on to show whose bird it was.
Lodged in the Louis Fifteenth
candelabrum-tree of cockscomb-
tinted buttons, dahlias,
sea-urchins, and everlastings,
it perches on the branching foam
of polished sculptured
flowers–at ease and tall. The king is dead.
There are two stanzas each with a 7-8-6-8-8-5-9 syllabic count. Your goal is to mimic her syllabic count (which results in a kind of “modern” sonnet) while focusing on one specific place in your life: Your home, your favorite restaurant, a vacation spot… any location that you can paint with words.
Your second poem can take any form and shape you want as long as each line has at least another line with the same number of syllables elsewhere in the poem. Identify your syllables at the end of each line.
Complete this entry AFTER you write your syllabic poems:
So, you just finished writing TWO syllabic verses, one based on Marianne Moore’s model and one of your own creation. In approximately 200+ words, which of your two poems do you prefer and why? Do you find this practice of writing syllabic verse more liberating than sonnets and/or villanelles?
so one page with both TWO syllabic verses poems,(one based on Marianne Moore’s model and one of your own creation) the next page answer the questions

 

 

Read the following paragraph. Use the following information as support. Points:

Read the following paragraph.
Use the following information as support.
Points:
Ecuador (Country in South America)
Guayaquil (City in Ecuador)
Guayaquil is one of the most beautiful cities in Ecuador, however one of the most dangerous of the country. Actually, it’s the most dangerous city indeed. Guayaquil is located in the hot region of Ecuador and contains Ecuador’s #1 Airport. Guayaquil is a very busy city; from yellow taxi’s racing everywhere to beautiful iguanas roaming in the parks naturally and freely.
Although Guayaquil has its beauty, it also has its devil in the white city.
It’s very easy to get robbed in Guayaquil because robbers can easily tell who is not a Guayaquil native, and who is from another country.
To picking up an accent from a different side of Ecuador to picking up how an international stands at the corner of a street in Guayaquil; Guayaquil robbers are fast, intuitive, and suave with citizens.
Guayaquil is like the Spanish version of Manhattan, New York, but instead of seeing pizza and hotdogs and halal beef everywhere for sale, you see Baked Chicken, Bakeries, and motorcycles everywhere.
The second you take your phone out in Guayaquil, somebody is looking at you from far away and has possibly made you her target. You think that just taking a selfie at a historic statue will make it to Instagram but soon enough you’ll feel someone whisper in Spanish to your ears: “give me your phone or you’re getting stabbed” and you see a small Chef knife out of their sleeve.
Javier Chuqui is a robber from Guayaquil, Ecuador who is brave and fearless however nobody knows that he’s being captive from Ecuador’s biggest gang called: Almighty Latin King.
They shot everyone in his family besides his 3 year old daughter who’s still alive. The only reason why he’s still robbing is because the gang continues to threaten to kill his daughter if he doesn’t fulfill their tasks.
He hasn’t killed anyone yet, but he makes sure to always go back to his victims and do an act of good deed in return. People often refer to him as, “El Santo Diablo” translating in English to “The Saint Devil” (“the good devil.” )
Javier Chuqui feels that Ecuador is a disgraced country, and feels that the true robbers are the ones working in a police station, hospitals, and in the embassies of Ecuador, where Ecuadorian Citizens easily pay bills of cash for those corrupts to do something for their own benefits.
It comes to the point where his daughter was able to leave Ecuador, however the gang was still tied up with Javier Chuqui.
Javier Chuqui felt the need and desire to expose to the public that the true robbers of Ecuador are sitting right in front of their faces, and how this gang is actually being helped the corrupts of Ecuador.
Javier fled Ecuador, went to Colombia and negotiated with another gang from Colombia, bought protection, and right before a public actor from Ecuador was going to approve and state that Javier was 100% right, was killed. This public actor and entertainer named Efrain Ruales. The murder in Ecuador of the popular 36-yearold -made even the President Lenín Moreno give instructions to investigate the case and details underlying it.
READ THIS.
Epic Poem: A long, narrative poem that tells about the adventures of a hero who reflects the ideals and/or values of a nation or race
Elements of Epic Poems:
1. The main character or protagonist is heroically larger than life, often the source and subject of legend or a national hero.
2. The fate of his people depend on the hero.
3. There is a course of action in which the hero performs great and difficult deeds.
You will write part of an epic poem. Poem must include the following features:
1. A narrative about GUAYAQUIL, ECUADOR, portraying a specific antihero (in this case JAVIER CHUQUI) with a name who speaks (poetic diction) in a specific manner.
2. Narrative: The poem will sound and read like a story. It can be told in the first or the third person. Poem must have a least 50 lines. It can be the beginning, the middle or end of the poem. Epic poems are usually much longer. The poem has to be in stanzas (4 or 6 lines each but you do not need to rhyme). 
3. Place: display a sense of place and beginning, going back in time (must be about Guayaquil, Ecuador. You must use those details of city life in Ecuador)
4. Features: portray the antihero JAVIER CHUQUI and extraordinary qualities. (e.g.,, a fearless, brave man with outgoing skills to Robb but has a good heart).
5. Poetic diction: The way JAVIER CHUQUI SPEAKS(e.g., in a story about an impulsive man named Luis, this was portrayed in the colloquialisms of the cowboys. Employ real colloquialisms and idioms that you hear common with Latin country. In addition, must use these 5 words in the poem:
1. GAINSAY: deny or contradict (definition)
2. RUMPUS: a noisy disturbance; a commotion (definition)
3. GAUCHO: a cowboy of the South American pampas (definition)
4. PULPERIA: the name given to company stores and dining facilities in parts of South America (definition)
5. Cimarrón meaning “wild” or “untamed”. This word usually referred to runaways or castaways and is ultimately derived from the word for “thicket” in Old Spanish.
6. Figures of Speech:
have at least 4 metaphors, 2 anaphora, and 2 simile. 
NO PLAGARISM.

 

 

minimum five paragraphs long. must contain an intro, body and closing. should id

minimum five paragraphs long.
must contain an intro, body and closing.
should identify the poem’s title, genre, and poet in the introduction–NO announcements like this: “In this essay I am going to explicate the poem ‘Rat’ by Stuart Little.” Review the essay samples from the Overview to see how this should be done.
should contain a one-sentence thesis statement at the end of the intro–what is the poem’s overall meaning or message? Tip: Review the sample essays in our overview. They are structured correctly.
Cite your poem both inside your essay (in-text citations) and at the end in MLA 8th ed format. Use this guide:
Recall that I want you to cite the lines of your poem in your in-text citations, regardless of your poem’s publication format.
Do not search for explanations or copy essays from the internet.
YES, do look up unknown words and proper nouns, and other allusions (references) you may not know.
YES, do your best.
Your header should be vertically listed in the left hand corner, single-spaced. Also give your essay a creative, relevant tile.

 

 

PART 1 Begin by writing a paragraph telling us about a person you know well. Wha

PART 1
Begin by writing a paragraph telling us about a person you know well. What kind of music does he/she like? What sort of clothing does he/she wear? What sort of interests does this person have? What sports? What does he/she look like? Your descriptions in this section should be fairly subjective (filled with your opinions about what sort of person he/she is). This paragraph should be written in prose form. Next, get access to this person’s bedroom or office—someplace where there will be lots of personal objects. Now, write a paragraph showing—in close detail—what you see. Begin with the bedside table, or the objects on the dresser or desk, and work your way around the room. Be sure to write enough detail that we can visualize what the objects are. This paragraph should not contain any subjective descriptions, but rather a series of objective details describing objects. This paragraph, too, should be written in prose form (in other words, don’t worry about poetic lines right now). Your finished product should be roughly one typed page (double-spaced) consisting of two lengthy paragraphs.
PART 2
Now take some of the descriptions of objects from the person’s room you’ve selected and break these descriptions into lines for a poem that will offer the reader a description poem about the person. Don’t worry about development breaks such as stanza breaks (if you find this too intimidating—but please use them if you want to). DO, however, make use of sound devices (assonance/consonance/alliteration) and line breaks (try enjambment if you wish). This will keep your poem from sounding like a mere list of closely described objects. Your finished product, when read aloud, will conjure up clear, precise images of a lived-in space which, in turn, will give us an excellent glimpse into the person who inhabits that space.

 

 

Annotate at least 15 instances total from the lists below. At least 5 annotation

Annotate at least 15 instances total from the lists below.
At least 5 annotations must be for figurative & symbolic language, and at least 5 annotations must be for the sounds of poetry. You must have 15 total (so this could be 5 in one category and 10 in the other, or 7 in one category and 8 in the other, etc.).
Figurative & Symbolic Language (at least 5 annotations)
simile
metaphor
pun
synecdoche
personification
hyperbole
paradox
conventional symbol
literary/contextual symbol
allegory
situational irony
verbal irony
satire
dramatic irony
Sounds of Poetry (at least 5 annotations)
onomatopoeia
alliteration
assonance
eye rhyme
internal rhyme
exact rhyme
near rhyme
masculine rhyme
feminine rhyme
Important Notes:
You don’t have to include everything from the list. You only need to have 15 annotations total.
Yes, you can have more than one annotation of the same element (e.g. more than one annotation for satire).
Use specific terms for the literary elements when possible (e.g say “verbal irony” instead of just irony).
You can include as many poems from the list as you wish in order to locate and annotate 15 instances.
Have at least 5 annotations for figurative and symbolic language, and at least 5 for the sounds of poetry, with 15 total.
Each Annotation must include ALL the following:
Highlighted or quoted segment of the story
Label of a specific literary element (e.g. foreshadowing)
Explanation of why this segment is an example of that literary element.
Review the sample annotation from Lecture 1 and notice that it has all three of these.

 

 

Annotate at least 15 instances total from the lists below. At least 5 annotation

Annotate at least 15 instances total from the lists below.
At least 5 annotations must be for figurative & symbolic language, and at least 5 annotations must be for the sounds of poetry. You must have 15 total (so this could be 5 in one category and 10 in the other, or 7 in one category and 8 in the other, etc.).
Figurative & Symbolic Language (at least 5 annotations)
simile
metaphor
pun
synecdoche
personification
hyperbole
paradox
conventional symbol
literary/contextual symbol
allegory
situational irony
verbal irony
satire
dramatic irony
Sounds of Poetry (at least 5 annotations)
onomatopoeia
alliteration
assonance
eye rhyme
internal rhyme
exact rhyme
near rhyme
masculine rhyme
feminine rhyme
Important Notes:
You don’t have to include everything from the list. You only need to have 15 annotations total.
Yes, you can have more than one annotation of the same element (e.g. more than one annotation for satire).
Use specific terms for the literary elements when possible (e.g say “verbal irony” instead of just irony).
You can include as many poems from the list as you wish in order to locate and annotate 15 instances.
Have at least 5 annotations for figurative and symbolic language, and at least 5 for the sounds of poetry, with 15 total.
Each Annotation must include ALL the following:
Highlighted or quoted segment of the story
Label of a specific literary element (e.g. foreshadowing)
Explanation of why this segment is an example of that literary element.
Review the sample annotation from Lecture 1 and notice that it has all three of these.

 

 

Annotate at least 15 instances total from the lists below. At least 5 annotation

Annotate at least 15 instances total from the lists below.
At least 5 annotations must be for figurative & symbolic language, and at least 5 annotations must be for the sounds of poetry. You must have 15 total (so this could be 5 in one category and 10 in the other, or 7 in one category and 8 in the other, etc.).
Figurative & Symbolic Language (at least 5 annotations)
simile
metaphor
pun
synecdoche
personification
hyperbole
paradox
conventional symbol
literary/contextual symbol
allegory
situational irony
verbal irony
satire
dramatic irony
Sounds of Poetry (at least 5 annotations)
onomatopoeia
alliteration
assonance
eye rhyme
internal rhyme
exact rhyme
near rhyme
masculine rhyme
feminine rhyme
Important Notes:
You don’t have to include everything from the list. You only need to have 15 annotations total.
Yes, you can have more than one annotation of the same element (e.g. more than one annotation for satire).
Use specific terms for the literary elements when possible (e.g say “verbal irony” instead of just irony).
You can include as many poems from the list as you wish in order to locate and annotate 15 instances.
Have at least 5 annotations for figurative and symbolic language, and at least 5 for the sounds of poetry, with 15 total.
Each Annotation must include ALL the following:
Highlighted or quoted segment of the story
Label of a specific literary element (e.g. foreshadowing)
Explanation of why this segment is an example of that literary element.
Review the sample annotation from Lecture 1 and notice that it has all three of these.