We’ve been discussing “academic writing” in various ways in relation to writing

We’ve been discussing “academic writing” in various ways in relation to writing

We’ve been discussing “academic writing” in various ways in relation to writing by Kevin Roozen, Charles Bazerman, James E. Porter, Linda Adler-Kassner, and Staples et al., drawing meaningful connections across ideas in these texts. Furthermore, we have used those texts as examples of academic writing in reflection upon what academic writing is, what possibilities it opens up for us, and what limits it places on our discourse. The assignment responses we’ve been writing up to this point have been largely directed at your instructor, who you could assume has already read the texts and can fill in any gaps in reasoning between ideas. Now, we turn to producing a version of that academic writing ourselves, an “essay” which combines ideas from some of the course texts and from elsewhere (your own experiences, extended examples, or external sources) in a “line of inquiry” which serves a “controlling purpose” of your own design.
The essay has to connect the topic of intertextuality and writing is a social and rhetorical activity how are they similar and how are they different.

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